M | H Theater Seat's Makeover (Step-by-Step Guide)

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These theater seats were definitely a labor of love, but they were so worth it! Below is the process I took to restore them and give them a second chance at life!

The Prep Process:

  • I took apart everything and removed the top layer of veneer. The veneer was really messed up and beyond repair so my only option was to take it all off. I ended up scraping and chipping it all off with a hammer and metal putty knife/scrapper. There were a few stubborn spots, but thankfully most of it came off pretty easily.

  • I glued and clamped the plywood together where it had separated. This process took a few days because there was a lot of separation in the seats, as you can see in the “before” picture above.

  • Once the veneer was completely removed and everything was fixed/glued, I used 60 grit sandpaper on my orbital sander because I needed something really course to get rid of any leftover glue

  • I followed up with 120 grit sandpaper on my sander and smoothed everything out

  • I then wiped everything down with Mineral Spirits. Once it was nice and dry I started the painting process

The Painting Process:

The Staining Process:

Once everything cleaned, fixed, painted and stained, I put everything back together. I replaced the old screws and bolts with new ones since the originals were rusty and pretty bent up. I purchased the new ones from Lowe’s.

I love that I am able to use these in my studio and believe it or not, they are actually pretty comfortable to sit in!

As always, thank you so much for tuning in this week for #MondayMakeoversWithFallon. If you want to save this blog post so you can refer back to it, make sure you pin it to your Pinterest page and/or feel free to share it elsewhere. I look forward being with you next Monday and don’t forget to tune in tomorrow for my educating video tutorial/tip for #TuesdayTipsWithFallon!!

*Please note, this post does contain affiliate links.

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How To Get This Look! Raw Dresser Makeover

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Happy Monday! I originally planned on a different makeover today but when I posted this dresser yesterday I received a ton of comments and questions, so I decided to write a blog post on it to help you guys out!

As I stated in yesterday’s post, our home was filled with other people’s furniture, my paint supplies, business paperwork and staging decor for so long I didn’t realize how empty our downstairs would be when I moved all of my business stuff out to the new studio. SO, I decided to keep this one because it has so much character. Plus, it was handmade in the 1850’s in my hometown and I have now poured my heart into the restoration so it’s a keeper in my book!

See the process below…

Now, the crazy part is that everyone thought this was the dresser that I was working on in my post where I am laying on the ground and I look flat-out exhausted, hahaha, but it’s actually a different one! I had to split the sanding up over a couple of days because this piece is a little larger than that one, but they are very similar in style! Ohhh, should I keep that one, too!? AHH! The struggle is real!!

The process was actual very simple, A LOT of work, but simple:

  • Vacuumed the whole piece inside-and-out

  • Cleaned and scrubbed with TSP

  • Fixed the loose areas with Titebond and made sure all the of the old square nails were still nailed in well and functioning properly

  • I then sanded and sanded and sanded and sanded with 60 grit sandpaper on my orbital sander. I intentionally did not sand out every single mark and scratch because I wanted to keep some of the original character. My goal was to just remove all of the old stain. I then followed up with 120 grit on my orbital sander to smooth everything out

  • I hand sanded with 220 grit (since I knew I wasn’t going to stain this piece I went with a higher grit to make it extra smooth)

  • Dusted off the piece with shop towels and vacuumed it really well

  • Sanded the knobs, painted them with General Finishes Lamp Black using my Square brush by Zibra, then distressed them with 150 grit sandpaper. I sealed the knobs with Country Chic Paint’s Natural Clear Wax (USE affiliate code: MARKETHOUSE10 to receive 10% off!)

  • Since the piece was so old, I went ahead and shellac’ed the inside of it, as well as the drawers

  • Finally, the sealing part. I’ve had a lot of questions about this and honestly, I did not seal this one. Since I’m keeping this piece for my own home and I know it’s not going to get a ton of use where I’m placing it, I did not top coat it. When you top coat or add a wax it tends to darken and change the color of the wood, so I didn’t want to take any chances of that happening because I was in love with the current look. HOWEVER, if I was going to use this piece in a bathroom or a high traffic area, I would definitely seal it with a poly or a clear wax. If for some reason it does get a dark spot on it and/or get’s dirty, I can just hand-sand it out!

*Just as a side note, make sure you always work in an open and well ventilated area Use a respirator mask, gloves and protective eye wear when necessary. Make sure your family and/or kids aren’t breathing in the harsh chemicals and dust either. Everyone’s health is more important than a piece of furniture!

I hope this information helps!! Thank you so much for tuning in this week for #MondayMakeoversWithFallon. Make sure you sign up to get my email’s so you don’t miss out on my makeovers and FREE tips!! Also, if you want to save this blog post so you can refer back to it, make sure you pin it to your Pinterest page and/or feel free to share it elsewhere. I look forward being with you next Monday and don’t forget to tune in tomorrow for my educating video tutorial/tip for #TuesdayTipsWithFallon!!

*Please note, this post does contain affiliate links.

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Want to see more makeovers with FREE step-by-step guides and tutorials!? Just click the pictures below!!

Antique Drop Leaf Table Makeover Step-by-Step Guide! Trash to treasure!

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I found this antique drop leaf table on the side of the road and as soon as I saw the square nails from the 1800's I knew the value and potential and was definitely willing to put in the work to make it beautiful again.

The character on this piece is awesome!! After hours of work, it's now an awesome, authentic farmhouse drop-leaf table See the process below.

This piece was split and broken in a lot of places. I think I had clamps on it for a couple of weeks total. The legs were uneven, so my husband cut the bottoms and I sanded them down make them even. The before pictures speak for themselves, haha. I cleaned and sanded the heck out of this piece. As far as the colors go, I wanted them to go along with the age of the table, so I chose a primitive green for the base and a natural/raw look for the top so you could see the beautiful imperfections.

I decided to take off one of the drop-leaf's because somewhere along the way it was changed out with a mismatched warped board. I kept it though in case the person who bought it would want it, but did not add it back to the table. With that being said, the person who ended up purchasing it bought it to use as a desk and was going to push it up against the wall anyway, so the extra leaf didn’t matter. Yay!

The Prep Process:

  • I scrubbed this piece from top to bottom with TSP.

  • I glued and fixed every crack, split and broken area with Titebond and clamps

  • I decided to sand off the stain on the top since it was coming off any way. I used 120 grit sandpaper on my Orbital Sander, followed by 220 grit to clean up the roughness from the 120 grit. For the base, I hand sanded with 220 grit sandpaper

  • Vacuumed the piece

  • I cleaned the whole thing again with TSP. Once it was nice and dry I started the painting process.

The Painting Process:

As always, thank you so much for tuning in this week for #MondayMakeoversWithFallon. If you want to save this blog post so you can refer back to it, make sure you pin it to your Pinterest page and/or feel free to share it elsewhere. I look forward being with you next Monday and don’t forget to tune in tomorrow for my educating video tutorial/tip for #TuesdayTipsWithFallon!!

*Please note, this post does contain affiliate links.


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DIY IKEA Apothecary Box Makeover

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About a week ago I shared these cute knock-off small apothecary cabinets on my Instagram stories and I got a lot of personal DM’s asking me about them. So, I decided to make a blog post with all the details! See below…

I have been looking for something to sit on top of my desk to could hold smaller item’s but I couldn’t find anything in my budget that I liked, so I came up with my own idea. When my sister and I went to Ikea last month, I bought these cute little cabinet-drawers for $16.99/each. I loved the size of them, but wasn’t crazy about the look.

I decided to take out the drawers and turn them around (so you couldn’t see the finger-pull) and use some of the awesome card catalog pulls that I purchased from D.Lawless Hardware to make them fit my style and the decor in my office.

Step 1: Since these drawers aren’t made of the highest quality wood, there are a lot of “particles” that sit on if it, so I took a 220 grit sanding block and sanded down all of the sides.

Step 2: Clean-off dust with vacuum

Step 3: I sprayed a thin coat of of BIN primer to the outsides. *Anytime you use spray primer or spray paint, make sure you’re in an open area and always wear a respirator mask and gloves.

Step 4: Sanded any remaining “particles” that may have been lifted from the wood when I applied the primer.

Step 5: Sprayed 2 coats of white Rust-Oleum spray paint to everything, including the insides

Step 6: After everything was nice and dry I added card catalog pulls that I purchased from D.Lawless Hardware. Instead of using tack-nails, since the wood is thin, I just used Multi-Surface Titebond and glued the pulls to the drawer. If you don’t have Titebond, Gorilla Glue or Loctite would also work well.

In case you’re wondering the measurements are: 16.5” long x 12.5” tall x 7.25” deep.

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As always, thank you so much for tuning in this week for #MondayMakeoversWithFallon. If you want to save this blog post so you can refer back to it, make sure you pin it to your Pinterest page and/or feel free to share it elsewhere. I look forward being with you next Monday and don’t forget to tune in tomorrow for my educating video tutorial/tip for #TuesdayTipsWithFallon!!

*Please note, this post does contain affiliate links.


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Baseball Room Makeover (Step-by-Step Guide!)

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I thought I would change it up this week and talk about my son’s baseball room makeover. He asked for a new baseball room for his 7th birthday, so my husband and I decided to surprise him while he was away on a small camping trip with his grandparent's. His room isn’t very big so I had to be strategic in the the design. I wanted to make it fun while also making it functional. I also wanted to make the room kid friendly, yet classy, so that he could enjoy it now and also as he gets older. Below is the before-and-after process and the steps we took to get the look!


“Before” pictures of his room:

The Faux Brick Wall:

First, I painted the walls, ceiling and trim. The wall color is Pemetic Trail and the trim is Alabaster, both by Sherwin-Williams. Second, we purchased large faux brick panels from Lowe’s for the accent wall. I didn't particularly care for the red and black color that came on the panels, but I loved the look of the brick, so I decided to whitewash and sand them down to make the bricks look more realistic. I did this by painting a light coat of white paint (the same paint I used on the trim) and then I used 220 git on my orbital sander to take off some of the paint so the brick would have a worn look to it.

You can purchase these 4’ x 8’ panels in the wood department at Lowe’s, but keep in mind that Lowe’s does not cut particle board because it’s so messy and tends to rip if you’re not careful. So, you will need a table saw or circular saw on hand if you need to cut them to fit your needs.

My husband and I hung the panels with liquid nails and a nail gun. As you can see, we used three different panels to cover the length of the wall. Because of this, there are two lines going down the wall where the panels meet. This is where the “dugout” comes into play. We added 1” x 2” stripes down the wall to blend the panels together and to also have an outline for the dugout. This allowed us to hid the lines, attach the wood pieces to form the bench and to also add the black roof at the top. We applied white trim along outside edges of the brick and drywall to give it a nice finished look.

On the opposite side of the room there is an awkward small angled wall, so we repeated the look of the brick wall to help tie everything together nicely.

The Dugout:

We added a "dugout" to serve as the focal point for the room. In the dugout I created a desk for my son that looks like an old-worn bench. I carried the same wood over to the left side of the room and used it as wall shelves to tie the areas together. The wood was reclaimed from my husband's grandparent's old barn, which makes it even more special!

  • The poles are round wooden spindles (purchased from Lowe’s) that I spray painted with silver Rustoleum Spray Paint, to mimic metal legs that are typically on a dugout bench. 

  • I painted a small stool that I found at a yard sale for $3! I painted the legs of the stool with General Finishes Lamp Black to match his dresser, and the top of the seat to look like a baseball. Thankfully, it was the perfect height! I used a bowl as an outline to mimic the edges of the baseball and I free-handed the stitches.

  • I found the lockers at another yard sale. I cleaned them up, spray painted them with Rustoleum Black Spray paint in Satin. Now, they serve as excellent place to store (and hide!!) his toys! 

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The Scoreboard:

I made my son a large scoreboard, with his name(s) being the theme, to hang over his bed and carried the theme over to the sign that is also in his dugout. The scoreboard has chalkboard slats on it, so he can actually write on it if he wants! Both items make a huge impact and the scoreboard is functional! Win - win! For some reason though, when he write on the slats, the “home” team always wins. Hummm…haha. Anyway, I purchased the chalkboard slats from Michael’s, but I tried to make everything else. My sister has a Silhouette, so she graciously cut out all of the letters and numbers that I needed to customize the scoreboard.

  • I sketched out all of my measurements before I started applying the vinyl cut-outs and the paint. The size of his board is 3ft x 4ft so I wanted to make sure I didn’t make any mistakes. We purchased the pre-cut board from Lowe’s.

  • I started by painting the entire board with General Finishes Snow White.

  • Once the white paint was nice and dry, I laid out the vinyl cut-outs and painter’s tape.

  • I then painted the green color over the whole thing, including all of the painter’s tape and vinyl pieces. The green color I used on the scoreboard is called, Soccer Pitch. by Sherwin-Williams and I purchased it from Lowe’s.

  • I waited about an hour and then went back and pulled off all of the painter’s tape and vinyl stickers while the green paint was still a little tacky. I find it more difficult to pull these items off when the paint is completely dry.

  • I touched up the green and white areas.

  • I then sealed the whole board with a coat of General Finishes High Performance Top Coat in Flat to protect it.

  • I measured out and added “C” hooks and hung the black scoreboard slats, but you could also use nails if you wanted to.

The Dresser Makeover:

I re-did the chest-of-drawers, too. The previous owners of our house left it when they moved out, so thankfully it was free! I wanted it to go along with the locker theme, so I painted it black and added numbers to it. I also painted the outside of the drawers white and lined the drawers with black-and-white paper to mimic the attire of an umpire/ref.

THE PREP PROCESS:

  • I removed the drawers, took off the knobs (placed them in a Ziplock bag).

  • I cleaned the whole piece with Krud Kutter and shop towel and I removed the stickers with Guu Gone.

  • I put 220 grit sandpaper on my random orbital sander and sanded every inch of the dresser.

  • I then vacuumed off all of the sanding dust, the inside of the drawers and I also vacuumed the inside where each drawer sits

  • I cleaned the whole piece with Krud Kutter and shop towels again.

  • Once the prep process was complete, I waited 24 hours to make sure any of the chemical products I used had ample time to dry. Then I applied my paint.

THE PAINTING PROCESS:

Once everything was nice and dry, I put everything back together and my husband added and re-positioned the new handles for me. The industrial handles are from Wayfair.

“After” picture’s of his room:

 I "fluffed" the room with a few sentimental items that date back 4 generations in our families.

  • The ball gloves above his closet were used by his dad, granddad and great-granddad.

  • The umpire counter was used by his great-grandfather to ump games, so my husband made a little box from leftover barnwood to hang it up.

  • The baseballs, bats and starting lineup figures belong to his dad, who used to have them in his room when he was younger.

  • A few other special touches include: 1, 2, 3 (strikes you're out) baseball hat hangers (purchased from Michael’s a while back), baseball knobs on the closet doors (purchased from Hobby Lobby) and on his nightstand, baseball lamps (yard sale and zulilly.com), personalized baseball bedding (zulilly.com) and a couple of cute pictures of him and his teams. The cool Under Armour sign was given to me when I worked in the Sport Performance world, so I added it to his room to give it a nice athletic feel!

It was such a fun room to redo and it was pocket friendly since we did all of the work ourselves. Plus, most of the items were reclaimed or I purchased them from yard sales. We all love to hang out in the room now! I definitely think we hit it out of the park!

It was also a HUGE honor to have my son’s baseball room featured on Project Junior’s website and Instagram page! Here is the featured article .

As always, thank you so much for tuning in this week for #MondayMakeoversWithFallon. If you want to save this blog post so you can refer back to it, make sure you pin it to your Pinterest page and/or feel free to share it elsewhere. I look forward being with you next Monday and don’t forget to tune in tomorrow for my educating video tutorial/tip for #TuesdayTipsWithFallon!!

*Please note, this post does contain affiliate links.


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Step-by-Step Guide: Antique White and Blue Hutch Makeover

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Happy Monday! This was the first piece I redid in my new studio so I thought it would be nice to make this today’s #MondayMakeoversWithFallon blog post. This was a custom piece for a sweet family that was moving. They purchased it from our local Habitat for Humanity Restore and had me refinish it for them to go in their new home. See the process below.

THE PREP PROCESS:

  • I removed the drawers, took off the knobs (placed them in a Ziplock bag)

  • This piece needed to be cleaned really well, so I spent at least three hours one day cleaning and prepping it. I scrubbed it down with a 3M sponge and TSP (twice) before I started to sand it. It had some wax and dirt build-up on it from the original finish and years of use, so I wanted to make sure it was all off before I started sanding it.

  • After it was dry, I sanded the piece really well. It had a lot of scratches on it, so I used 150 grit sandpaper on my orbital sander and then I followed up with 220 grit to smooth it out a little bit.

  • I then vacuumed off all of the sanding dust, inside and out.

  • I cleaned the whole piece one more time Krud Kutter and shop towels. I wanted to make sure any lose dirt and dust from where I sanded it was completely gone.

  • Once the prep process was complete, I waited 24 hours to make sure the chemical products I used had ample time to dry.

THE PAINTING PROCESS:

Once everything was nice and dry, I put everything back together and added new oil-rubbed bronze knobs and pulls from Lowes.

Thank you so much for tuning in this week for #MondayMakeoversWithFallon. If you want to save this blog post so you can refer back to it, make sure you pin it to your Pinterest page and/or feel free to share it elsewhere. I look forward being with you next Monday and don’t forget to tune in tomorrow for my educating video tutorial/tip for #TuesdayTipsWithFallon!!

*Please note, this post does contain affiliate links.

Step-by-Step Guide: Agate 3-Drawer Dresser Makeover

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As soon as I saw this oak dresser and the beautiful hardware, I knew I wanted to paint it dark blue. However, since it was an older piece, I didn’t want the paint to look perfect. I wanted it to look warn with a little bit of distressing and chip around the edges. See the process below on how I achieved the look I was going for:

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The Prep Process:

  • I removed the hardware and since I knew I was going to reuse it, I placed each one in a labeled ziplock bag so I could return the pulls to the exact location they came off of.

  • I cleaned the hardware (here is a short video to see how I clean pulls like the ones on this dresser). I also cleaned and shinned up the key holes using the same process, except I carefully did it while they were still attached to the drawer. I didn’t want to risk taking them out of the drawer since they were so old.

  • The piece was really clean when I purchased it, but I went ahead and cleaned it with Krud Kutter before I scuff-sanded everything with 220 grit sandpaper.

  • After I sanded it, I vacuumed it really well and cleaned it again with Krud-Kutter.

The Painting Process:

  • For the body of the piece I used Agate by Old Barn Milk Paint. I applied two coats with my Zibra 2” Palm Pro letting each coat dry well in-between.

  • Once both coats were dry, I lightly hand-sanded it with 220 girt sandpaper to give it an aged look. By doing this it added some depth to the piece. The paint also naturally chipped in a few places which was exactly what I wanted!

  • I sealed the entire piece with Clear Wax by Old Barn Milk Paint. After it sat on the piece for about 30 minutes, I buffed it with a shop towel to make it nice and smooth.

  • I put the original handles back on. I love how they shinned up and looked so great with the dark blue!! This piece still had the original skeleton key with it, too…and it worked!! How cool is that!?

Thank you SO much for tuning in this week for #MondayMakeoversWithFallon. If you want to save this blog post so you can refer back to it, make sure you pin it to your Pinterest page and/or feel free to share it elsewhere. I look forward being with you next Monday and don’t forget to tune in tomorrow for my educating and inspiring #TuesdayTipsWithFallon!!

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Step-by-Step guide to The Bacon Desk Makeover!

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Trash to Treasure!

A friend of mine saw this desk in a trash pile, sent me a picture and then put it in her driveway until we could pick it up. About an hour later my husband went and picked it up for me and the rest was history!

See before-and-after pictures and the process below…

When my husband brought it home, I immediately went to town on it. I loved that it was an executive style desk and I could see that it had a lot of potential, but man, did it need a lot of work! The body of the piece was in decent shape. It just needed to be cleaned and sanded really well. The top, however, was a different story.

The Prep Process:

Step 1: I removed all of the veneer that was on the top. The veneer was really messed up and beyond repair so my only option was to take it all off.  I was not able to do all of this in one day. I had to tackle it an hour or two at a time over a week long period. I think I only busted my knuckles about 4 times, ha! I ended up scraping and chipping it all off with a hammer and metal putty knife/scrapper. I tried a hair dryer, the iron and towel trick and I also tried a heat gun, but the glue from the veneer was not budging, so I literally sanded-and-sanded…and sanded…until all of the glue was off the top. I used 40 grit sandpaper on my Orbital Sander because I needed something really course to get rid of the glue. Shew! I’m going to say I spent at least 10 to 15 hours on just the top part…BUT, look at the awesome grain underneath!!! It was totally worth it in my book.

Step 2: I filled a few deep scratches on the base of the desk and repaired and tighten any other loose areas.

Step 3: I vacuumed it first and then I cleaned it really well. I gave this one a nice long bath with TSP. Inside and out.

Step 4: I sanded every inch of it with my Orbital Sander.  At this point I was just sanding the drawers and the body of the desk since I had already sanded down the top really well.  Being that the piece was in rough shape to begin with, I wasn’t afraid of scratching it up so I put 120 grit sandpaper on my sander and smoothed everything out. followed by 220 grit to clean up the roughness from the 120 grit.

Step 5: I then used my pre-paint cleaner by Krud Kutter and cleaned the whole thing again. Once it was nice and dry I started the painting process.

The Painting Process:

Step 1: Tape off all the edges of the drawers with painter’s tape and fill the current hardware holes with wood filler. Sand. Repeat x2.

Step 2: I applied 2 coats of BIN Primer to the base of the desk and all of the drawers because I could just tell that this piece was going to be a bleeder. 

Step 3: I decided I wanted to go with an earthy color so it would look cohesive with the natural wood top. As soon as I saw, Conquer, by Country Chic Paint I knew it would be the perfect fit (Use code: MARKETHOUSE10 at checkout if you’re interested in purchasing this color). I applied three coats to all drawers and base of the desk.

Step 4: I lightly the distressed the edges so you could see the white coming through. I loved how it made the piece “pop.”

Step 5: I applied 3 coats of Country Chic Top Coat to the base and the top of the desk.

Step 6: I added a brown glaze by General Finishes to bring everything together. By adding the glaze it helped the earthy hues from the paint and the wood top tie together nicely.

Step 7: Once the painting was done, I added maps as drawer liners and used Oil and Wax by Old Barn Milk Paint on the sides of the drawers.

Step 8:  I honestly liked the hardware that was originally on the desk, but I decided I wanted something a little bigger, so I purchased new drawer pulls from Amazon and my husband installed them for me!

This piece was definitely a labor of love and I spent more hours on it than I probably should have, but that’s okay because I love the end result. I mean after all, who doesn’t love a desk top that looks like it has a piece of bacon laying across it? If that doesn’t make you want to “bring home the bacon,” I don’t know what will! If you are interested in seeing the listing, here is the direct link to my Online Marketplace.

Thank you so much for tuning in this week for #MondayMakeoversWithFallon. If you want to save this blog post so you can refer back to it, make sure you pin it to your Pinterest page and/or feel free to share it elsewhere. I look forward being with you next Monday and don’t forget to tune in tomorrow for my educating video tutorial/tip for #TuesdayTipsWithFallon!!

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Step-by-Step Guide: Small Old Barn Milk Paint Sideboard

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I love small sideboards! If I could paint one every single day, I would. As soon as I saw this one I knew I wanted to go with an aged-chippy look. See the process below:

The Prep Process: I didn’t want this piece to have a crazy amount of “chip” so I prepped it pretty well to avoid that from happening.

 

The Painting Process:

Thank you SO much for tuning in this week for #MondayMakeoversWithFallon. If you want to save this blog post so you can refer back to it, make sure you pin it to your Pinterest page and/or feel free to share it elsewhere. I look forward being with you next Monday and don’t forget to tune in tomorrow for my educating and inspiring #TuesdayTipsWithFallon!!

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Step-by-Step Guide: Skinny Lap Wall

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I have had a lot of questions about the “skinny lap” wall that I put up in my office, so I thought I would share all the details on today’s #MondayMakeoversWithFallon. I intentionally made my office space small because I would rather have more painting space in the studio. With that being said, I still wanted to give it some character. so I added a modern skinny-lap accent wall with raw 1x2’s. At first I wasn’t sure if I wanted to paint or keep the wood raw, but once it was up, I decided to keep it as-is and I love how it turned out with my black industrial style desk against it. Read below for all the details!

Materials Needed:

I scoped out the 1x2’s at both Lowe’s and The Home Depot and I liked the way the ones looked at The Home Depot better, so that’s what I went with! Each board is 8ft long and my wall was only 6ft, so we had to cut them down with a Miter Saw to fit. You can get the boards cut at the store if you don’t have a saw at home but after the first cut a lot of stores charge you, so just keep that in mind. I purchased about 20 more boards than I actually needed because I knew some of them would have big holes, splits, divots and/or discoloring, because after all they’re just inexpensive 1x2’s. They come in packs of 15 or you can purchase them individually. When the project was over, I returned the unused boards. If you want to go with pine, oak, poplar, etc, plan on spending a lot more!! As you can see from the picture, each board was only $1.04. Not bad, right!?

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Step 1: Lay out the boards the way you want them to look on the wall and measure each one to the length you need them. Note: if you want to go ahead and cut a board and use it as your template for measuring it will make things a lot quicker. Just make sure it’s the correct fit before you mark all of the other boards.

Step 2: Cut boards to measured length. Before you cut every single board, double check a few of them to make sure they fit well on the wall.

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Step 3: Sand the ends of the boards with a 220 grit sanding block where you cut them. Since they aren’t a hardwood, the wood will most likely split a little on the ends. This helps smooth it out so it looks nicer and so you don’t get splinters!

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Step 4: Draw a line on the wall where the studs are. You may need to use a stud finder for this. Make sure you use at least a 4ft level so the boards aren’t crooked.

Step 5: Start at the bottom of the wall (this is different than standard Shiplap. Typically you want to start at the top of the wall with Shiplap). Place board on the wall, above the baseboards, nail the board into the wall where you marked the studs. Before you go to the next board, make sure it’s level!

Step 6: Place wide craft sticks across the top of the board that you just nailed to the wall. I chose to use wide craft sticks because they are longer than quarters, allowing them to stay on the wood better. Make sure you get the wide ones though if you go this route. If you get regular size popsicle/craft sticks they will get stuck when you try and pull them out of the crack! The wide craft sticks make it much easier.

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Step 7: Grab your next board and start nailing it into the studs. Repeat steps 5 - 8 until you are done! Measure the total height of the boards . I knew I wanted to add a shelf to the top so I only went about 6ft high. Cut your edges to fit this height.

Step 8: Nail the molding to the edges of the 1x2’s. You don’t have to do this part, but I highly recommend it because it ties everything together and it makes the wall look nice and neat. If you go all the way up the wall with your 1x2’s then I also recommend adding a piece of molding to the top where the final 1x2 meets the ceiling. The molding can also be purchased at The Home Depot or Lowe’s.

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You may be asking, what do I do if I have an outlet in the wall?

Just cut the 1x2’s to fit around it. You can finish the edges around the outlet with molding or keep as-is. I kept mine as-is because my desk is going to hide it, but you may want to clean it up a little by adding molding. I recommend using the same molding that you used on the outside edges in Step #8. Also, if you have an outlet that sits back pretty far after you put the wood up, you can buy an extender that allows the outlet to come out further from the wall, making it easier to access.

Above are before-and-after pictures of the wall! When we were done putting it up, I decided to use a few more 1x2’s and make a matching chalkboard on the wall beside it to tie everything together. I directly applied the chalkboard paint to the wall (this is not the same type of chalk paint used on furniture), using a foam roller and then my husband nailed the 1x2’s directly to the wall. See pictures below.

I know this wasn’t a typical furniture makeover, but sometimes I will do different tutorials like this for #MondayMakeoversWithFallon. I appreciate you stopping by and if you want to save this blog post so you can refer back to it, make sure you pin it to your Pinterest page and/or feel free to share it elsewhere. I look forward being with you next Monday and don’t forget to tune in tomorrow for my educating video tutorial/tip for #TuesdayTipsWithFallon!!

*Please note, this post does contain affiliate links.

Step-by-Step Guide, Industrial Desk Makeover

#MondayMakeoversWithFallon

Happy New Year’s Eve!! Today’s Monday Makeover is actually something I redid for myself. Can you believe it? I saw it for sale on Facebook Marketplace and immediately knew I wanted it for my new office space. Since my studio/office is more on the industrial side I wanted a desk to go along with that style. I loved the bones of the desk, but wasn’t crazy about the finish it had on it, so purchased it and gave it a face-lift! Now it goes perfect in my new space! See the process below:

THE PREP PROCESS:

  • I removed the drawers, took off the knobs (placed them in a Ziplock bag).

  • I cleaned the whole piece with Krud Kutter and shop towels

  • I knew I was going to use different handles, so I went ahead and filled the holes on the drawers. I did this using wood filler and a soft putty knife. I will provide a video tutorial on this soon!

  • I put 220 grit sandpaper on my random orbital sander and sanded every inch of the desk and made sure I smoothed out the wood filler I applied to the drawers too.

  • I then vacuumed off all of the sanding dust, the inside of the drawers and I also vacuumed the inside of the table where each drawer sits

  • I cleaned the whole piece with Krud Kutter and shop towels again.

  • I did a slightly different process for the table-top since I was planning on staining it versus painting it. Since the top was pretty dinged up, I decided not to strip it, instead I put 150 grit sandpaper on my random orbital sander and sanded off the original stain so that I could stain it a different color. This helped smooth out those rough areas in the wood while also helping me prep for the new stain. I then took a 150 grit piece of sandpaper and hand-sanded the top to make sure there weren’t any “swirls” in the wood. Since this piece was made of pine, which is soft wood it can easily get swirls, so the hand-sanding is imperative after using the orbital sander. When I was done sanding, I vacuumed of the top and then cleaned it really well with Mineral Spirits.

  • Once the prep process was complete, I waited 24 hours to make sure any of the chemical products I used had ample time to dry. Then I applied my paint…

THE PAINTING PROCESS:

Once everything was nice and dry, I put everything back together and my husband added and re-positioned the new handles for me. The industrial knobs are from Wayfair.

Thank you SO much for tuning in this week for #MondayMakeoversWithFallon. If you want to save this blog post so you can refer back to it, make sure you pin it to your Pinterest page and/or feel free to share it elsewhere. I look forward being with you next Monday and don’t forget to tune in tomorrow for my educating video tutorial/tip for #TuesdayTipsWithFallon!!

*Please note, this post does contain affiliate links.

Step-by-Step Guide, Modern-Farmhouse Hutch Makeover

#MondayMakeoversWithFallon

This pine hutch had great bones it just needed a face lift! Read below to see the process I took to make this hutch the perfect modern-farmhouse piece.

I always like to state up front that I am going to include some affiliate links throughout my posts/blog. I hope that you will use my links so that I can continue to provide you will my knowledge at no cost to you!! Yes, this momma has to put food on the table, but I sincerely want to provide you with as much great information as possible because I really do think it will be of value to you!! So helping me in this area will help both of us!! Thank you in advance for this!

THE PREP PROCESS:

  • I removed the drawers, took off the knobs (placed them in a Ziplock bag), took out the spindles in the center and removed the top hutch from the bottom table because it was two separate pieces

  • The piece was already super clean so I put 220 grit sandpaper on my random orbital sander and sanded every inch of it

  • I then vacuumed off all of the sanding dust, the inside of the drawers and I also vacuumed the inside of the table where each drawer sits

  • I cleaned the whole piece with Krud Kutter and shop towels

  • I did a slightly different process for the table-top since I was planning on staining it versus painting it. Since this piece was made of pine, which is a soft wood, I decided not to strip it, instead I put 150 grit sandpaper on my random orbital sander and sanded off the original stain so that I could stain it a different color. I then took a 150 grit piece of sandpaper and hand-sanded the top to make sure there weren’t any “swirles” in the wood. When I was done sanding, I vacuumed of the top and then cleaned it really well with Mineral Spirits

  • Once the prep process was complete, I waited 24 hours to make sure the chemical products I used had ample time to dry.

THE PAINTING PROCESS: Pine tends to have knots so I knew there was a good chance they would bleed through if I didn’t seal them really well before adding my paint color, especially since I was going to be applying antique white. In fact, if you look at the before picture of this piece, you can actually see where one of the knots bled through the manufacturer’s finish. It’s located on the front left leg about half way down. You can also visible see knots on the top molding, so I wanted to make sure I covered those up realllllllly well. How did I do this?!

Once everything was nice and dry, I put everything back together, lined the drawers with cute paper and added new oil-rubbed bronze knobs from D Lawless Hardware. They have great options on hardware and are pocket friendly, so make sure you check them out.

Thank you SO much for tuning in this week for #MondayMakeoversWithFallon. If you want to save this blog post so you can refer back to it, make sure you pin it to your Pinterest page and/or feel free to share it elsewhere. I look forward being with you next Monday and don’t forget to tune in tomorrow for my educating and inspiring #TuesdayTipsWithFallon!!

*Please note, this post does contain affiliate links.

Step-by-Step Guide, Antique China Cabinet Makeover!

#MondayMakeoversWithFallon

Welcome to #MondayMakeoversWithFallon!! I am so excited to get this going and look forward to providing you with great information while hopefully inspiring you along the way! Every piece of furniture is different, so most of the time the prep, painting and/or sealing process will be different. With that being said, make sure you take a look each Monday so you can learn and understand why I have taken different steps for each piece. I am self-taught, therefore I have spent countless hours and money experimenting over the years to figure out what works well and what doesn’t. That does not even include the long hours I have spent reading articles, information pamphlets and DIY books….and yes, this was before social media really took off, so I really had to learn the hard way. Lucky for you though, you don’t have to do that! You can tune in each week and learn something new without having to do all the things I did to get to where I am today!

Just so you know up front, I am going to include some affiliate links throughout my posts/blog. I hope that you will use my links so that I can continue to provide you with my knowledge at no cost to you!! Yes, this Momma has to put food on the table, but I sincerely want to provide you with as much great information as possible because I really do think it will be of value to you. So helping me in this area will help both of us!! Thank you in advance for this!

Alright, let’s get down to business! This black china cabinet is fresh in everyone’s mind since I shared it a little over a week ago, so I thought it would be a great way to kick off #MondayMakeoversWithFallon .  To the untrained eye this piece looks like it just needs to be lightly sanded and then you can start painting, but from a professionals point of view, “just a little sanding” is never good enough in my book. I want to do the best I can and know that I am giving my client’s the best refinished piece possible and I want the same for you! Here is the process I took for this specific piece:

THE PREP PROCESS:

  • I removed all of the hardware and placed it in a Ziplock bag so I wouldn’t lose any pieces

  • Removed drawer and inner shelves

  • Cleaned the entire piece with Mineral Spirits and a soft scrubbing sponge

  • Once the piece was completely dry, I sanded the outside and inside (any area that I was planning on painting) with 220 grit sandpaper. Since this piece was covered with veneer, I did not want to go any lower on my sandpaper grit. The veneer was in great shape and I did not want to take any chances and accidentally cause any scratches or imperfections with a low-grit sandpaper.

  • Vacuumed every inch possible (inside-and-out)

  • I then wiped down the entire piece with shop towels and Pre-Paint Krud Kutter

  • That was just the top of the piece, now onto the legs! I used 120 sandpaper and hand sanded the two front legs. I sanded-and-sanded until the legs were raw.

  • Once all of the stain was removed I cleaned up the legs with the Krud Kutter I mentioned above and wiped them down really well

  • FYI: I would typically remove the glass before I start the prep work, but I could not remove this particular glass without tearing out all of the glue and nails, so I decided to work around it this time.

THE PAINTING PROCESS: I wanted to be 100% sure that none of the cleaning products I used were still active, so I waited 24 hours to make sure the chemicals had time to evaporate and dry really well before I applied my first coat of paint.

  • I used my Zibra Paint 2” Palm Pro and painted 3 coats of General Finishes Lamp Black on the entire piece

  • The next day I distressed the edges with 220-grit sandpaper

  • I then vacuumed the lose sanding dust and made sure the piece was completely dust free

  • Next, I sealed the piece with Hemp Oil and buffed it with shop towels to give it a smooth shine

  • I stained the two front legs with Nutmeg Gel Stain by General Finishes. I did one light coat of the gel stain, then sanded it down a little bit to go along with the distressed edges on the top of the piece

THE HARDWARE: The hinges were in nice shape so I kept them as-is. I changed out the pulls on the drawer with new ones from Hobby Lobby. The new pulls were two separate pieces. One was a textured glass knob and the other was a brown metal knob with a back plate. I could not find the exact brown metal knob that I used on Hobby Lobby’s website, but here are some other ones in case you want to try and find something that looks similar. Here is the textured glass knob that I used.

  • I removed the brown metal knob and replaced it with the textured glass knob to give the hardware a “wow” factor

  • I didn’t want the back plate to look like heavy brown metal since the glass is so delicate and shiny, so I sanded it down little bit with 220 grit sandpaper

  • I then brushed on some of the General Finishes Gel Stain that I used on the legs so it would blend nicely

  • Once the stain was dry, I highlighted some of the raised areas with a touch of gold to give it some depth and tie the whole piece together

Again, thank you SO much for tuning in this week for my first #MondayMakeoversWithFallon. If you want to save this blog post, make sure you pin it to your Pinterest page and/or feel free to share it elsewhere. I look forward being with you each Monday and don’t forget to tune in each Tuesday for my educating and inspiring #TuesdayTipsWithFallon!!

*Please note, this post does contain affiliate links.