Step-by-Step Guide: Small Old Barn Milk Paint Sideboard

#MondayMakeoversWithFallon

I love small sideboards! If I could paint one every single day, I would. As soon as I saw this one I knew I wanted to go with an aged-chippy look. See the process below:

The Prep Process: I didn’t want this piece to have a crazy amount of “chip” so I prepped it pretty well to avoid that from happening.

 

The Painting Process:

Thank you SO much for tuning in this week for #MondayMakeoversWithFallon. If you want to save this blog post so you can refer back to it, make sure you pin it to your Pinterest page and/or feel free to share it elsewhere. I look forward being with you next Monday and don’t forget to tune in tomorrow for my educating and inspiring #TuesdayTipsWithFallon!!

Step-by-Step Guide: Skinny Lap Wall

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I have had a lot of questions about the “skinny lap” wall that I put up in my office, so I thought I would share all the details on today’s #MondayMakeoversWithFallon. I intentionally made my office space small because I would rather have more painting space in the studio. With that being said, I still wanted to give it some character. so I added a modern skinny-lap accent wall with raw 1x2’s. At first I wasn’t sure if I wanted to paint or keep the wood raw, but once it was up, I decided to keep it as-is and I love how it turned out with my black industrial style desk against it. Read below for all the details!

Materials Needed:

I scoped out the 1x2’s at both Lowe’s and The Home Depot and I liked the way the ones looked at The Home Depot better, so that’s what I went with! Each board is 8ft long and my wall was only 6ft, so we had to cut them down with a Miter Saw to fit. You can get the boards cut at the store if you don’t have a saw at home but after the first cut a lot of stores charge you, so just keep that in mind. I purchased about 20 more boards than I actually needed because I knew some of them would have big holes, splits, divots and/or discoloring, because after all they’re just inexpensive 1x2’s. They come in packs of 15 or you can purchase them individually. When the project was over, I returned the unused boards. If you want to go with pine, oak, poplar, etc, plan on spending a lot more!! As you can see from the picture, each board was only $1.04. Not bad, right!?

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Step 1: Lay out the boards the way you want them to look on the wall and measure each one to the length you need them. Note: if you want to go ahead and cut a board and use it as your template for measuring it will make things a lot quicker. Just make sure it’s the correct fit before you mark all of the other boards.

Step 2: Cut boards to measured length. Before you cut every single board, double check a few of them to make sure they fit well on the wall.

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Step 3: Sand the ends of the boards with a 220 grit sanding block where you cut them. Since they aren’t a hardwood, the wood will most likely split a little on the ends. This helps smooth it out so it looks nicer and so you don’t get splinters!

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Step 4: Draw a line on the wall where the studs are. You may need to use a stud finder for this. Make sure you use at least a 4ft level so the boards aren’t crooked.

Step 5: Start at the bottom of the wall (this is different than standard Shiplap. Typically you want to start at the top of the wall with Shiplap). Place board on the wall, above the baseboards, nail the board into the wall where you marked the studs. Before you go to the next board, make sure it’s level!

Step 6: Place wide craft sticks across the top of the board that you just nailed to the wall. I chose to use wide craft sticks because they are longer than quarters, allowing them to stay on the wood better. Make sure you get the wide ones though if you go this route. If you get regular size popsicle/craft sticks they will get stuck when you try and pull them out of the crack! The wide craft sticks make it much easier.

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Step 7: Grab your next board and start nailing it into the studs. Repeat steps 5 - 8 until you are done! Measure the total height of the boards . I knew I wanted to add a shelf to the top so I only went about 6ft high. Cut your edges to fit this height.

Step 8: Nail the molding to the edges of the 1x2’s. You don’t have to do this part, but I highly recommend it because it ties everything together and it makes the wall look nice and neat. If you go all the way up the wall with your 1x2’s then I also recommend adding a piece of molding to the top where the final 1x2 meets the ceiling. The molding can also be purchased at The Home Depot or Lowe’s.

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You may be asking, what do I do if I have an outlet in the wall?

Just cut the 1x2’s to fit around it. You can finish the edges around the outlet with molding or keep as-is. I kept mine as-is because my desk is going to hide it, but you may want to clean it up a little by adding molding. I recommend using the same molding that you used on the outside edges in Step #8. Also, if you have an outlet that sits back pretty far after you put the wood up, you can buy an extender that allows the outlet to come out further from the wall, making it easier to access.

Above are before-and-after pictures of the wall! When we were done putting it up, I decided to use a few more 1x2’s and make a matching chalkboard on the wall beside it to tie everything together. I directly applied the chalkboard paint to the wall (this is not the same type of chalk paint used on furniture), using a foam roller and then my husband nailed the 1x2’s directly to the wall. See pictures below.

I know this wasn’t a typical furniture makeover, but sometimes I will do different tutorials like this for #MondayMakeoversWithFallon. I appreciate you stopping by and if you want to save this blog post so you can refer back to it, make sure you pin it to your Pinterest page and/or feel free to share it elsewhere. I look forward being with you next Monday and don’t forget to tune in tomorrow for my educating video tutorial/tip for #TuesdayTipsWithFallon!!

Step-by-Step Guide, Industrial Desk Makeover

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Happy New Year’s Eve!! Today’s Monday Makeover is actually something I redid for myself. Can you believe it? I saw it for sale on Facebook Marketplace and immediately knew I wanted it for my new office space. Since my studio/office is more on the industrial side I wanted a desk to go along with that style. I loved the bones of the desk, but wasn’t crazy about the finish it had on it, so purchased it and gave it a face-lift! Now it goes perfect in my new space! See the process below:

THE PREP PROCESS:

  • I removed the drawers, took off the knobs (placed them in a Ziplock bag).

  • I cleaned the whole piece with Krud Kutter and shop towels

  • I knew I was going to use different handles, so I went ahead and filled the holes on the drawers. I did this using wood filler and a soft putty knife. I will provide a video tutorial on this soon!

  • I put 220 grit sandpaper on my random orbital sander and sanded every inch of the desk and made sure I smoothed out the wood filler I applied to the drawers too.

  • I then vacuumed off all of the sanding dust, the inside of the drawers and I also vacuumed the inside of the table where each drawer sits

  • I cleaned the whole piece with Krud Kutter and shop towels again.

  • I did a slightly different process for the table-top since I was planning on staining it versus painting it. Since the top was pretty dinged up, I decided not to strip it, instead I put 150 grit sandpaper on my random orbital sander and sanded off the original stain so that I could stain it a different color. This helped smooth out those rough areas in the wood while also helping me prep for the new stain. I then took a 150 grit piece of sandpaper and hand-sanded the top to make sure there weren’t any “swirls” in the wood. Since this piece was made of pine, which is soft wood it can easily get swirls, so the hand-sanding is imperative after using the orbital sander. When I was done sanding, I vacuumed of the top and then cleaned it really well with Mineral Spirits.

  • Once the prep process was complete, I waited 24 hours to make sure any of the chemical products I used had ample time to dry. Then I applied my paint…

THE PAINTING PROCESS:

Once everything was nice and dry, I put everything back together and my husband added and re-positioned the new handles for me. The industrial knobs are from Wayfair.

Thank you SO much for tuning in this week for #MondayMakeoversWithFallon. If you want to save this blog post so you can refer back to it, make sure you pin it to your Pinterest page and/or feel free to share it elsewhere. I look forward being with you next Monday and don’t forget to tune in tomorrow for my educating video tutorial/tip for #TuesdayTipsWithFallon!!

Step-by-Step Guide, Modern-Farmhouse Hutch Makeover

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This pine hutch had great bones it just needed a face lift! Read below to see the process I took to make this hutch the perfect modern-farmhouse piece.

I always like to state up front that I am going to include some affiliate links throughout my posts/blog. I hope that you will use my links so that I can continue to provide you will my knowledge at no cost to you!! Yes, this momma has to put food on the table, but I sincerely want to provide you with as much great information as possible because I really do think it will be of value to you!! So helping me in this area will help both of us!! Thank you in advance for this!

THE PREP PROCESS:

  • I removed the drawers, took off the knobs (placed them in a Ziplock bag), took out the spindles in the center and removed the top hutch from the bottom table because it was two separate pieces

  • The piece was already super clean so I put 220 grit sandpaper on my random orbital sander and sanded every inch of it

  • I then vacuumed off all of the sanding dust, the inside of the drawers and I also vacuumed the inside of the table where each drawer sits

  • I cleaned the whole piece with Krud Kutter and shop towels

  • I did a slightly different process for the table-top since I was planning on staining it versus painting it. Since this piece was made of pine, which is a soft wood, I decided not to strip it, instead I put 150 grit sandpaper on my random orbital sander and sanded off the original stain so that I could stain it a different color. I then took a 150 grit piece of sandpaper and hand-sanded the top to make sure there weren’t any “swirles” in the wood. When I was done sanding, I vacuumed of the top and then cleaned it really well with Mineral Spirits

  • Once the prep process was complete, I waited 24 hours to make sure the chemical products I used had ample time to dry.

THE PAINTING PROCESS: Pine tends to have knots so I knew there was a good chance they would bleed through if I didn’t seal them really well before adding my paint color, especially since I was going to be applying antique white. In fact, if you look at the before picture of this piece, you can actually see where one of the knots bled through the manufacturer’s finish. It’s located on the front left leg about half way down. You can also visible see knots on the top molding, so I wanted to make sure I covered those up realllllllly well. How did I do this?!

Once everything was nice and dry, I put everything back together, lined the drawers with cute paper and added new oil-rubbed bronze knobs from D Lawless Hardware. They have great options on hardware and are pocket friendly, so make sure you check them out.

Thank you SO much for tuning in this week for #MondayMakeoversWithFallon. If you want to save this blog post so you can refer back to it, make sure you pin it to your Pinterest page and/or feel free to share it elsewhere. I look forward being with you next Monday and don’t forget to tune in tomorrow for my educating and inspiring #TuesdayTipsWithFallon!!

Step-by-Step Guide, Antique China Cabinet Makeover!

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Welcome to #MondayMakeoversWithFallon!! I am so excited to get this going and look forward to providing you with great information while hopefully inspiring you along the way! Every piece of furniture is different, so most of the time the prep, painting and/or sealing process will be different. With that being said, make sure you take a look each Monday so you can learn and understand why I have taken different steps for each piece. I am self-taught, therefore I have spent countless hours and money experimenting over the years to figure out what works well and what doesn’t. That does not even include the long hours I have spent reading articles, information pamphlets and DIY books….and yes, this was before social media really took off, so I really had to learn the hard way. Lucky for you though, you don’t have to do that! You can tune in each week and learn something new without having to do all the things I did to get to where I am today!

Just so you know up front, I am going to include some affiliate links throughout my posts/blog. I hope that you will use my links so that I can continue to provide you with my knowledge at no cost to you!! Yes, this Momma has to put food on the table, but I sincerely want to provide you with as much great information as possible because I really do think it will be of value to you. So helping me in this area will help both of us!! Thank you in advance for this!

Alright, let’s get down to business! This black china cabinet is fresh in everyone’s mind since I shared it a little over a week ago, so I thought it would be a great way to kick off #MondayMakeoversWithFallon .  To the untrained eye this piece looks like it just needs to be lightly sanded and then you can start painting, but from a professionals point of view, “just a little sanding” is never good enough in my book. I want to do the best I can and know that I am giving my client’s the best refinished piece possible and I want the same for you! Here is the process I took for this specific piece:

THE PREP PROCESS:

  • I removed all of the hardware and placed it in a Ziplock bag so I wouldn’t lose any pieces

  • Removed drawer and inner shelves

  • Cleaned the entire piece with Mineral Spirits and a soft scrubbing sponge

  • Once the piece was completely dry, I sanded the outside and inside (any area that I was planning on painting) with 220 grit sandpaper. Since this piece was covered with veneer, I did not want to go any lower on my sandpaper grit. The veneer was in great shape and I did not want to take any chances and accidentally cause any scratches or imperfections with a low-grit sandpaper.

  • Vacuumed every inch possible (inside-and-out)

  • I then wiped down the entire piece with shop towels and Pre-Paint Krud Kutter

  • That was just the top of the piece, now onto the legs! I used 120 sandpaper and hand sanded the two front legs. I sanded-and-sanded until the legs were raw.

  • Once all of the stain was removed I cleaned up the legs with the Krud Kutter I mentioned above and wiped them down really well

  • FYI: I would typically remove the glass before I start the prep work, but I could not remove this particular glass without tearing out all of the glue and nails, so I decided to work around it this time.

THE PAINTING PROCESS: I wanted to be 100% sure that none of the cleaning products I used were still active, so I waited 24 hours to make sure the chemicals had time to evaporate and dry really well before I applied my first coat of paint.

  • I used my Zibra Paint 2” Palm Pro and painted 3 coats of General Finishes Lamp Black on the entire piece

  • The next day I distressed the edges with 220-grit sandpaper

  • I then vacuumed the lose sanding dust and made sure the piece was completely dust free

  • Next, I sealed the piece with Hemp Oil and buffed it with shop towels to give it a smooth shine

  • I stained the two front legs with Nutmeg Gel Stain by General Finishes. I did one light coat of the gel stain, then sanded it down a little bit to go along with the distressed edges on the top of the piece

THE HARDWARE: The hinges were in nice shape so I kept them as-is. I changed out the pulls on the drawer with new ones from Hobby Lobby. The new pulls were two separate pieces. One was a textured glass knob and the other was a brown metal knob with a back plate. I could not find the exact brown metal knob that I used on Hobby Lobby’s website, but here are some other ones in case you want to try and find something that looks similar. Here is the textured glass knob that I used.

  • I removed the brown metal knob and replaced it with the textured glass knob to give the hardware a “wow” factor

  • I didn’t want the back plate to look like heavy brown metal since the glass is so delicate and shiny, so I sanded it down little bit with 220 grit sandpaper

  • I then brushed on some of the General Finishes Gel Stain that I used on the legs so it would blend nicely

  • Once the stain was dry, I highlighted some of the raised areas with a touch of gold to give it some depth and tie the whole piece together

Again, thank you SO much for tuning in this week for my first #MondayMakeoversWithFallon. If you want to save this blog post, make sure you pin it to your Pinterest page and/or feel free to share it elsewhere. I look forward being with you each Monday and don’t forget to tune in each Tuesday for my educating and inspiring #TuesdayTipsWithFallon!!