Keeping Your Hardware Organized! #TuesdayTipsWithFallon

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When you paint and restore furniture, most of the time you should take the hardware off before you start the prepping and painting process. When you do this, it’s important that you stay organized if you plan on re-using the hardware. In this case, I highly recommend you keep track of the exact location where the hardware came off of. Often times hinges and handles form to the wood, especially softer woods like pine and poplar. If you try to put the hardware back in a different location it will not function as well as it once did.

Unfortunately, I learned this one the hard way! There were times before I started keeping track, that my husband and I would spend hours trying to figure out where the original hinges went because they were not fitting back on the doors correctly. Kitchens can especially be frustrating because there are so many doors and they have been near moisture, causing the hardware to really take shape to the wood.

Even if you think you will remember where each one was located, you won’t. It’s nearly impossible. Go ahead and take a few extra minutes in the beginning and do this. I promise, it will save you so much time, effort and frustration in the end!

Thank you so much for stopping by for #TuesdayTipsWithFallon! Make sure you tune in each week for a new tip! If you want to save this blog post, just pin it to your Pinterest page and/or feel free to share it elsewhere. Don’t forget to tune in to my Facebook page tomorrow to read about my #WomenInBusinessWednesday!! Thanks again! Happy organizing!!

*Please note, this blog post does contain affiliate links.


Don’t forget to check out my other #TuesdayTipsWithFallon videos and blog posts below!

How To Fix Flaws In Wood Furniture With Bondo

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I feel like the video is the easiest way for you to see and understand the process , so I definitely suggest you take a few minutes and watch it.

Either way, Bondo is an excellent way to fix large holes, large scratches, broken trim, or other flaws in wooden furniture. It is also great to use on chipping veneer but I will show you how to apply it to that in another #TuesdayTipsWithFallon tutorial. I only recommend this product when you’re planning on priming and painting your piece. In my experience, it does not go well with stain or gel stain.

Before you start working with Bondo make sure you are in a well ventilated area and that you’re wearing a respirator mask.

Materials you will need:

Once you apply the Cream Hardener, you will need to work quickly! If you plan on forming or shaping the Bondo in any way, make sure you do it before the Bondo hardens. If you wait too long, it will be too hard to work with and your only option will be to sand it. I recommend waiting about 15 minutes before you apply a second coat or start trying to shape it. Once it’s completely dry, then you can sand it. If the Bondo is rough use a low-grit sandpaper (40, 60 or 80) and then as becomes smoother, use 220 grit. Once everything is nice and smooth and exactly the way you want it, apply a couple coats of primer. After that, you can finally paint!

Thank you so much for stopping by for #TuesdayTipsWithFallon! Make sure you tune in each week for a new tip! If you want to save this blog post, just pin it to your Pinterest page and/or feel free to share it elsewhere. Don’t forget to tune in to my Facebook page tomorrow to read about my #WomenInBusinessWednesday!! Thanks again! Happy Bondo’ing!!

*Please note, this blog post does contain affiliate links.


Make sure you check out my other #TuesdayTipsWithFallon videos and blog posts below!!

The 3 Types of Paint-Mediums/Brands That I Currently Use To Paint Furniture

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Two of the most common questions I get asked are, “Fallon, what type of paint do you use” and “what type of paint do you recommend I purchase?” In the video below I describe the three different types of paint-mediums that I currently use. There are so many great products on the market, this is just what I have my hands on at the moment.

Make sure you use the affiliate code MARKETHOUSE10 to receive 10% off your Country Chic Paint purchase.

Thank you so much for stopping by for #TuesdayTipsWithFallon! Make sure you tune in each week for a new tip! If you want to save this blog post, just pin it to your Pinterest page and/or feel free to share it elsewhere. Don’t forget to tune in to my Facebook page tomorrow to read about my #WomenInBusinessWednesday!! Thanks again! Happy Painting!!

*Please note, this blog post does contain affiliate links.


Don’t forget to check out my other #TuesdayTipsWithFallon videos and blog posts below!!

How To Re-Use A Paint Tray!

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Today’s tip is simple and easy, but like I said in the video, heavy duty Aluminum Foil has saved me so much money over the year’s. Plus, if you get the longer length instead of the standard, you can use it on large paint trays, too!

Thank you so much for stopping by for #TuesdayTipsWithFallon! Make sure you tune in each week for a new tip! If you want to save this blog post, just pin it to your Pinterest page and/or feel free to share it elsewhere. Don’t forget to tune in to my Facebook page tomorrow to read about my #WomenInBusinessWednesday!! Thanks again! Happy Painting!!

*Please note, this blog post does contain affiliate links.

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Make sure you check out my other #TuesdayTipsWithFallon videos and blog posts below!!

How To Fill Hardware Holes In Wooden Furniture

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Filling holes in the drawers of your wooden furniture is something that you should definitely know how to do if you want to change or update the look.  The standard measurement for hardware handles/pulls is typically 2.5” – 3.0” from center-to-center.  Meaning, if you take off the handle/pull and look at the back of it, this is the space in between the center of the screw holes.  A lot of times, people plan on using new hardware, but then they get to the end and realize that the new hardware they had in mind does not fit the old holes.  AH! This is the worst!  So, to fix that problem, I just go ahead and fill the holes 90% of the time.  The reason behind this is because a lot of times I do not pick out my pulls or knobs until the end of the restoration so I can see what the paint looks like first, but if you want to plan ahead, just measure up-front and purchase the current hole-to-hole size. Watch the video below to see how I do this!

Materials Needed:

1.       Wood Filler

2.       Sandpaper 220 grit

3.       Plastic Putty Knife

4.       Painters Tape or Masking Tape

5.       Primer

Step 1:  Take off your current hardware (Pulls, Knobs or whatever is currently on your piece of furniture) and put them in a baggie. Even if I am not planning on reusing this hardware, I like to keep them on hand in case something accidentally goes wrong and I need to reuse them.  Also, it is important to keep them on hand because sometimes when you purchase new knobs or pulls, the length of the screws are different from what you used before, causing the screws to not fit correctly.  This way you can just use the original screws and it works out perfectly!

**Sometimes there is some grit and grim around the edges where the hardware sat for years, so if necessary, I take a 150 grit piece of sandpaper and sand down those areas until everything is even and smooth. I like to clean it off with a baby wipe or a damp paper towel as I go.

Step 2:  Take a small piece of painters tape or masking tape, large enough to cover the hole, and place it on the inside of the drawer/door so that you can no longer see the hole. This helps prevent the Wood Filler from oozing out the other side. I keep the tape on until the very end of the project, too, so that the Wood Filler has time to dry nice and hard.

Step 3: Take the Wood Filler and Plastic Putty Knife and fill in the hole and any indention’s that the previous hardware may have left in your drawer/door.

Step 4: After the Wood Filler from Step 3 has dried, take a piece of 220 grit sandpaper and smooth it out.  You may have to repeat Steps 3 and 4 if there are still indention’s.  There have been situations where I have had to do this 3 times, just to make it nice and smooth.  Each piece is different.

Step 5:  Once you are satisfied with your filled holes, wait the recommend time that the Wood Filler indicates and then apply primer.  Some people skip the priming step, but I think it is important because it helps smooth out the Wood Filler even more and it also helps prevent your paint from being splotchy in the areas you just filled.

Now you are ready for paint and you can purchase whatever hardware you want!

Thank you so much for stopping by for #TuesdayTipsWithFallon! Make sure you tune in each week for a new tip! If you want to save this blog post, just pin it to your Pinterest page and/or feel free to share it elsewhere. Don’t forget to tune in to my Facebook page tomorrow to read about my #WomenInBusinessWednesday!! Thanks again! Happy filling!!

*Please note, this blog post does contain affiliate links.

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Don’t forget to check out my other #TuesdayTipsWithFallon videos and blog posts below!!

The best brush for painting spindles, detailed moldings and getting those hard to reach spots!

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Have you ever painted a chair with spindles and thought to yourself, what have I gotten myself into!? This is going to take forever! Don’t worry, we all have! If you don’t have a spray gun, which most people don’t, it can be a very daunting task. So let’s fix that! All you need is this awesome Round Brush by Zibra. It will make painting these areas so much easier and more enjoyable!! This awesome brush is “must” have in your painters tool box! Like all Zibra brushes, this one provides a smooth paint application which is key to helping you achieve minimal brush marks. See my video below!

The Zibra Round Brush, is a 1” round bristle brush that was designed specifically for painting spindles, detailed moldings, trim, candlesticks, corbels, etc.. The gentle bristles form well to ornate surfaces while still providing maximum coverage. It has an ergonomic hourglass shaped handle that fits comfortable in your hand. The brush also holds a nice amount of paint, so you don’t have to re-dip it into your paint every-other-second allowing you to cover more area in less time. The Zibra Round Brush is also pocket friendly, costing somewhere between $10 - $15, depending on where you purchase it.

Each Zibra Brush is made with a smooth bristle technology unlike a conventional bristle brush. It can be used with all types of paint mediums and stains and you only need soap and water to clean it up (as long as you used a water based paint). I use it when I am painting with milk paint, acrylic milk paint, chalk paint and latex. They clean up super well too.

As I stated in the blog post where I discussed the Zibra Triangle Brush, (Click here to watch/read that post) I want you to know that I do have an affiliate link through Zibra’s website and of course, I would love for you to use it, but in all honesty, you can get them at The Home Depot and Lowe’s Home Improvement if you need to go ahead and start your painting project. I don’t want you to miss out on the opportunity to use one because they really do help with your painting needs! You can also enter to win a Zibra Round Brush for FREE!! All you need to do to enter is leave a comment on either my Facebook or Instagram post stating that you have read it and you have also shared it. All those that comment and state where they have shared the blog post will be entered into the random drawing. (Giveaway ends at Midnight EST on Friday, February 8, 2019. Winner will be contacted via DM and/or email, so make sure you enter your email address. Winner will be announced on social media, Sunday, February 10, 2019. You must be at least 18 years of ago, within the US and agree to be mentioned on social media.) There will be 1 winner for this giveaway. Winner will receive a Zibra Round Brush!.

Thank you so much for stopping by and learning about the Zibra Round Brush for today’s #TuesdayTipsWithFallon! Make sure you tune in each week for a new tip! If you want to save this blog post, just pin it to your Pinterest page and/or feel free to share it elsewhere. Don’t forget to tune in to my Facebook page tomorrow to read about my #WomenInBusinessWednesday!! Thanks again! Happy painting!!

How to EASILY Cut Screws To Fit Your Hardware

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There is nothing more frustrating than a screw that sticks out 2 inches on the inside of your drawer. Watch the video below for a quick tip on how to cut these screws with ease.

Okay, so all I can see in this video is the part where I said the “nut” was a “bolt”….ugh…but anyway, I guess that’s what I get for not reading a script. You guys get the real “me” all of the time. Haha, and sometimes that just happens. Anyway, here is a link for electric wire/screw cutters. They are a great option if you need a quick and easy was to cut them to length.

Thank you so much for stopping by for #TuesdayTipsWithFallon! Make sure you tune in each week for a new tip! If you want to save this blog post, just pin it to your Pinterest page and/or feel free to share it elsewhere. Don’t forget to tune in to my Facebook page tomorrow to read about my #WomenInBusinessWednesday!! Thanks again! Happy restoring!!

*Please note, this blog post does contain affiliate links.

How to help stubborn wood drawers slide better!!

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Do you ever have trouble with wooden drawers “sticking” when you try to slide them in-and-out? A lot of older antiques are built with beautiful handmade dovetail drawers and function with only the use of wooden drawer slides. They aren’t as functional as today’s metal drawer slides. If you watched last week’s #TuesdayTipsWithFallon (Here is the link to that video tip) this concept is similar in the fact that wood swells in the warmer months and shrinks in the cooler months causing the wooden drawers to stick making them difficult to open. Watch the video below…

For today’s tip I recommend using a candlestick, tea light, a bar of soap or chunk of natural wax, like the kind that I used in the video from Country Chic Paint to help your wooden drawers slide well. Just apply the product to the wood inside your piece of furniture and the bottoms/tops of the drawers that meet or touch that wood. I always recommend using SCENT-FREE waxes/soaps because you do not want to attract any bugs or insects that are drawn to your fruity smelling soap, for example. Also, I still like to go ahead and apply wax to the wooden drawers even if it’s the middle of winter and the drawers are functioning well because it can’t hurt, right?! That way when summer does roll around you hopefully won’t have to worry about it. Keep in mind, this is not a permanent fix . The wax can wear off over-time, so just reapply it when needed.

If the drawer(s) still seems to “stick” and not glide well after you have applied the wax, you may need to sand it and the drawer slides really well to give it a nice smooth surface. If that still doesn’t help, the problem is bigger and there is most likely something wrong with the structure. For example, if someone had a bunch of heavy books or heavy tools in the drawers and they sat there for years-and-years it is likely the wood formed to that heaviness which caused warping and small breaks or tears in the wood. Sometimes you can fix these problem with glue and sanding, other times they need to be replaced, especially if you can see that visible warping has occurred.

I recommend keeping a candlestick or tealight in one of the drawers of these pieces so you can quickly reapply the wax if any of the drawers start to act stubborn!

Thank you so much for stopping by for #TuesdayTipsWithFallon! Make sure you tune in each week for a new tip! If you want to save this blog post, just pin it to your Pinterest page and/or feel free to share it elsewhere. Don’t forget to tune in to my Facebook page tomorrow to read about my #WomenInBusinessWednesday!! Thanks again! Happy restoring!!

*Please note, this blog post contains affiliate links.

Thinking About Painting Your Kitchen Cabinets? Read And Watch This Tip FIRST!!

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Alright you guys, I am going to be completely honest with you. I learned this one the hard way. I recommend you watch my 2-minute video and also read this blog post so you can learn and understand the whole story. Thank goodness this mistake was on my own kitchen cabinets and not someone else’s. A few (plus) years ago when I was thinking about getting into the world of painting kitchen cabinets, I decided to give ours a shot first. Side note, I intentionally practice on my own furniture/cabinets when I am trying something new.  Don’t worry! Again, this was years ago! Like I’ve stated in the past, I am self-taught, therefore I have spent countless hours and money experimenting over the years to figure out what works well and what doesn’t. That does not even include the long hours I have spent reading articles, information pamphlets and DIY books….and yes, this was before social media really took off, so I really had to learn the hard way. Lucky for you though, you don’t have to do that! You can tune in each week and learn something new without having to do all the things I did to get to where I am today!

So here’s the situation. We have nice solid oak kitchen cabinets, but they are original to the house and very dated. We couldn’t afford to buy new ones, so I decided to paint the ones we have. I live in Southwest Virginia and the humidity doesn’t get too bad until July, or so I thought. Anyway, I decided to paint the cabinets during the month of June because I knew it was going to be nice out and I could use the extra space in the garage since it was warm. I didn’t work on them consistently because I had a baby in the house and life was extra crazy, so it took me a couple of weeks to complete them. When I was all done though, they looked awesome! The kitchen was light, airy and beautiful and it looked so much better….until the fall months rolled around.

It was October, I was standing in my kitchen and I was looking at my cabinets and I noticed a huge crack going down ALL of the sides of the doors. I remember feeling sick to my stomach because I worked so hard on them and they now looked awful. I kept thinking to myself, what did I do wrong? Why did they all of a sudden split? Did I prep them wrong? Was the paint old? Was there too much paint in the corners...maybe? Then I talked to my brother-in-law about the the situation. Thankfully, he is super intelligent when it comes to lumber and wood work. He said that, “wood is a living source until it is burned and because of the humidity/moisture during the summer months, it caused the cabinets to swell,” which of course, was when I painted them. Then when the fall season rolled around and the humidity/moisture went away, the wood shrunk causing the splits and/or separation in the molding from the edge of the cabinets to occur. As much as I hated to hear that, It totally made sense.

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I knew I wanted to start a blog one day, so I kept one of the original doors that I painted because I wanted you to see the difference from the summer months to the winter months. I thought my mistake would be a great learning opportunity for anyone interested in painting cabinets so they could avoid making the mistake too. I feel like part of my job is to give you the best information possible, so over the years I have talked to other cabinet maker’s and painter’s and I have learned some great information about this situation. One of the things that really struck me was that professional cabinet makers intentionally leave a gap around the inside of the molding that is attached to cabinet door. They do not glue this area down, allowing the wood room to shrink and expand without splitting. Also, when a cabinet maker crafts the doors, they spray or stain the door BEFORE he or she attaches the molding so when the door does move, you can’t tell.

Now that people are painting cabinets more often, this visible separation in the molding from the cabinet door is becoming more of a factor. In my experience this is only geared toward solid wood cabinets. I think it’s important to note while engineered woods such as MDF, particle board and plywood are not nearly as nice as real wood, they typically aren’t affected by the humidity like an authentic piece of wood is. Man, I wish I would have known this before I spent hours-upon-hours painting my cabinets! To fix the problem, I had to scrape, sand down, repaint and reseal all of the sides where the molding meets the door. To prevent me from having to go through that process, I thought about adding a strip of caulk along the edges and then paint over it, but honestly, I knew that was the lazy way out. I knew that it too could move with the wood and it would probably cause even more cracking/peeling down the road, so it wasn’t worth it. I just has to suck it up and redo them the correct way (during the non-humid months)! However, I waited about a year to do this because I wanted to see if the doors would swell again during the summer months, causing the split to disappear, and sure enough they did! The paint on the doors was not perfect like it once was, but the gap was gone when June/July rolled around. I was mind blown. Haha.

If you’re thinking about painting your solid wood cabinets, how do you avoid this from happening? Either paint your solid wood cabinets in the late fall, winter or early spring months when the wood doors do not have any moisture and/or swelling in them. That way when the humid months come-and-go you won’t be able to tell because you painted them when they were at their smallest point. If you are unable to do this, it’s okay! I have painted plenty of cabinets during the summer months. You will just need to keep a dehumidifier going to help prevent any potential moisture from getting in them.  I always close off a room and keep a dehumidifier going about 95% of the time. I also believe there is a tool on the market that can test the moisture in wood, if you want to look into that.

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As I stated in the video, this does not apply as much to furniture as it does solid wood kitchen cabinets. Furniture is not at eye-level like 20 to 30 kitchen cabinets are. If I had to give you advice on one thing as far as furniture goes though, it would be to make sure you do not paint your edges too thick when your painting doors/moldings. The Zibra Square Brush is a great option to prevent that from happening if you’re brushing the paint on.

Thank you so much for stopping by for #TuesdayTipsWithFallon! Make sure you tune in each week for a new tip! If you want to save this blog post, just pin it to your Pinterest page and/or feel free to share it elsewhere. Don’t forget to tune in to my Facebook page tomorrow to read about my #WomenInBusinessWednesday!! Thanks again! Happy painting!!


Make sure you check out my other free #TuesdayTipsWithFallon videos and blog posts below!

The best brush for painting corners, trim and edges!!

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If you have followed me for any length of time, you know I love Zibra Paint brushes. A good quality brush is very important when you’re painting furniture and/or the walls within your home! In the upcoming months I am going to breakdown each Zibra paint brush and the purpose they serve. They are a great tool to have in your painter’s tool box because they make the painting process so much easier during certain situations. These brushes provide a smooth paint application which is key to helping you achieve minimal brush marks.

Now, who hates using painter’s tape? I know I do! Not only is it time consuming, but it can cost a lot of money over time. Typically, you have to take time to apply the painter’s tape, take it off when you’re done and then touch up where the tape took of the paint that you JUST painted. While I know there are circumstances that you need to use it, most of the time you may not have to because of the game-changing Zibra Triangle Brush! See my video below!

The Zibra Triangle Brush, was designed specifically for painting the corners and edges of furniture, trim and walls. The three sides of the brush hold a nice amount of paint, so you don’t have to re-dip it into your paint every-other-second. The wooden handle is in the form of an hourglass so it fits well in your hand, which is a huge plus in my book! Each Zibra Brush is made with a smooth bristle technology unlike a conventional bristle brush. It can be used with all types of paint mediums and stains and you only need soap and water to clean it up (as long as you used a water based paint). I know this sounds crazy, but since the bristles are SO soft, it actually makes the cleaning process easier.

In my opinion, the ZIbra Triangle is a brush that gets even better over time. The more you use it, the more to you will love it! It may take a little practice to get used to it, but once you do, you won’t be disappointed!!

The Zibra Triangle Brush is also pocket friendly. For example. this brush typically costs somewhere between $10 - $15, depending on where you purchase it. If you were to purchase a roll of painter’s tape, the price is somewhere between $7 - $10 for ONE standard size roll. If you paint for a living then you know and understand that every penny counts. If you use a roll of painter’s tape that costs close to same amount as the Triangle brush, you can’t reuse the tape and that money is now gone. If you use the Triangle Brush, you can use it over-and-over again, so it’s totally worth it!!

Just so you know, I do have an affiliate link through Zibra’s website and of course, I would love for you to use it, but in all honesty, you can get them at The Home Depot and Lowe’s Home Improvement if you need to go ahead and start your painting project. I don’t want you to miss out on the opportunity to use one because they really do help with your painting needs! You can also enter to win one of two Zibra Triangle Brushes and one of two Market | House T-Shirts for FREE!! All you need to do to enter is leave a comment on either my Facebook or Instagram post stating that you have read it and you have also shared it. All those that comment and state where they have shared the blog post will be entered into the random drawing. (Giveaway ends at Midnight EST on Friday, January 11, 2019. Winners will be contacted via DM and/or email, so make sure you enter your email address. Winners will be announced on social media, Sunday, January 13, 2019. You must be at least 18 years of ago and agree to be mentioned on social media.) There will be 2 winners. Each winner will receive a Zibra Triangle Brush and a Market | House T-Shirt.

Thank you so much for stopping by and learning about the Zibra Triangle Brush for today’s #TuesdayTipsWithFallon! Make sure you tune in each week for a new tip! If you want to save this blog post, just pin it to your Pinterest page and/or feel free to share it elsewhere. Don’t forget to tune in to my Facebook page tomorrow to read about my #WomenInBusinessWednesday!! Thanks again! Happy painting!!

This simple tip will help you revive the inside of your wooden furniture.

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After you have painted and/or restored the outside of your furniture, sometimes the inside needs revamping, too. In this #TuesdayTipsWithFallon you will learn a quick way to bring the scratched, dried out wood back to life without adding any additional color or stains. I will show you a different way to revive the original color/finish in another #TuesdayTipsWithFallon down the road.

Materials:

Shop towel or Old Lint Free Cloth/T-Shirt

Chip Brush

Old Barn Milk Paint, Oil and Wax

Rubber Gloves

Process:

Step 1: Roll the bottle of Oil and Wax from Old Barn Milk Paint. Do not shake to prevent air bubbles. Once it is mixed well, pour a little bit out onto your piece and start spreading it out with your Chip Brush.

Step 2: After you have covered all of the interior areas with the Oil and Wax, grab your cloth and rub the Oil and Wax into the wood. If there is any excess that has gathered in certain areas, rubbing it in will help it absorb quicker and more efficiently.

That’s it! Just makes just it is nice and dry before you place any items on the inside shelves.

*Please note, on the bottle it says you may need 3 coats for better protection, but since this is on the inside of your furniture, one coat should suffice. If you were using this on the top of a table or cutting board, I would recommend additional coats.

When the time comes to paint, make sure you check out my favorite brushes!!

You can use Oil and Wax for many other things, which I will discuss over time, but this is a great way to start with it!

Thank you so much for stopping by for my #TuesdayTipsWithFallon.! Make sure you tune in each week for a new tip! If you want to save this blog post, make sure you pin it to your Pinterest page and/or feel free to share it elsewhere. Don’t forget to tune in to my Facebook page tomorrow to read about my #WomenInBusinessWednesday!! Thanks again! Happy revamping!!

The Difference Between Sandpaper Grits for Painting Furniture

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#TuesdayTipsWithFallon: When you paint furniture, one of the most important steps in the process is sanding.  Please note, each piece is different and this is just an average guide to help you understand the difference between the sandpaper grits.  I highly recommend purchasing an industrial strength sandpaper.  If you try to go the cheap route you will end up spending more time changing out the paper rather than actually sanding, which will most likely cause you to spend more money in the end.

Click on the items below to see what I use:

  1. Sandpaper Sheets

  2. Block Sanding

  3. Sanding Discs for my Orbital Sander.

Here is a breakdown of the sandpaper grits.  The numbers are measured by grit size and the amount of grits/grains per square inch.  Note, projects typically start with a coarse sandpaper, then move to a more fine sandpaper as the project evolves.

40 – 80 Grit:  Coarse.  40 to 80 grit is used for heavy or rough sanding and to help remove scratches or imperfections.  While it is okay to be abrasive, take your time when using a low-grit sandpaper because it may show noticeable scratches or swirls in the wood. I like to use low-grit for surfaces that have an old thick coat of paint/stain on them or when a surface has a lot of nicks and scratches.  Please note, you DO NOT always need to start your project with this girt. As mentioned above, this is mainly used to remove old paint or scratches. If your piece is in great shape or has a thin sheet of veneer on it then it is not necessary to use this low of a grit, so just skip ahead to a 150-grit or perhaps a 220-grit if this is the case.

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100 – 150 Grit:  Medium.  100 – 150 gives the paint and/or stain enough to grip onto, without making the piece too smooth or too rough.  When I am painting or staining a piece, I make sure not to go over 150 grit.  This is just my personal experience, but once I start going higher than 150, it starts to seal the wood, making it more difficult for the wood to absorb the paint and/or stain.

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180 - 220 Grit:  Fine.  180 – 220 grit is primarily used for the sanding finish or to sand in-between coats. It is also great for distressing! There are instances where you can use 180 to 220-grit to rough up a piece in preparation for paint, but you do not typically use these grits until after your first coat.  Most of the time I use 220 grit because it is a tad bit smoother.  These are also great to help smooth out any scratches you may have caused from the previous low-grits you used, but make sure you do this before you start painting or staining.  

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320 – 400 Grit and Up:  Extra Fine.  320- 400 grit and up.  These higher-grits are used toward the end of a project when I am applying my top coat or sealer.  I gently use a 400 grit piece of sandpaper or a sanding block and run it across the paint/stain to give it an ultra-smooth finish.

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When using sandpaper make sure you always keep the pressure even so that your finish stays nice and level.  You also want to make sure you sand with the grain of the wood, so you do not cause any unnecessary scratches or imperfections.

Thank you so much for stopping by for this weeks #TuesdayTipsWithFallon! Make sure you tune in each week for a new tip! Look forward to seeing you then. Happy Sanding!!

How to Clean Your Existing Hardware for your Furniture

#TuesdayTipsWithFallon

Welcome to my first #TuesdayTipsWithFallon! Each Tuesday I will provide you with a short video and a written blog post with an educational tip to make the furniture painting process easier for you, I will also provide you with great information in my written tutorials that I provide for you each Monday called, #MondayMakeoversWithFallon, so don’t forget to check those out too! As I stated yesterday, I am self-taught, therefore I have spent countless hours and money experimenting over the years to figure out what works well and what doesn’t. That does not even include the long hours I have spent reading articles, information pamphlets and DIY books….and yes, this was before social media really took off, so I really had to learn the hard way. Lucky for you though, you don’t have to do that! You can tune in each week and learn something new without having to do all the things I did to get to where I am today!

Just so you know up front, I am going to include some affiliate links throughout my posts/blog. I hope that you will use my links so that I can continue to provide you with my knowledge at no cost to you!! Yes, this Momma has to put food on the table, but I sincerely want to provide you with as much great information as possible because I really do think it will be of value to you. So helping me in this area will help both of us!! Thank you in advance for this!

Check out the video and blog post below for my first #TuesdayTipsWithFallon!

After you have restored or painted a piece of furniture sometimes it is best to keep the hardware that originally came with the piece. Here is a great way to clean and restore the hardware and make it look new again.

The main ingredient you will use to clean your hardware is Bar Keepers Friend. It’s main purpose to is clean hard non-porous surfaces such as pots and pans, as well as other kitchen item’s that may have gathered rust, tarnish, mineral deposits and/or stains over the years, but it can work on numerous other things too. I have used it on furniture handles, pulls, hinges, screws, wheels, etc. It just a great product to have on hand!

 Materials Needed:

1.       Bar Keepers Friend

2.       Small amount of water

3.       Bowl (You can use a disposable if you have it on hand. If not, a bowl out of your kitchen cabinet will be fine. Just clean it well when you’re done.)

4.       Spoon or Wisk (You can use a disposable if you have it on hand. If not, a spoon out of your kitchen will be fine. Just clean it well when you’re done.)

5.       Chip Brush (Be prepared to throw this away when you are done cleaning your hardware)

6.       Soft stripping pad OR Steel Wool, Grade #0000

7.       Distilled White Vinegar (Optional)

8.       Shop towel (Optional) or an old lent free t-shirt.

9.       Old Barn Milk Paint Clear Wax or Natural Wax by Country Chic Paint (Make sure to use the code MarketHouse10 to receive 10% off of your Country Chic order!)

10. Rubber Gloves

BEFORE & AFTER OF HARDWARE.jpg

Step 1: You will want to follow the directions on the back of the Bar Keepers Friend container.  As you can see from the video, I do this so often that I just eyeball it now, but as you start out it may be easier for you to follow the exact directions.  In this step you will need your bowl, spoon and water so you can make a paste with the Bar Keepers Friend.

Step 2: Take your Chip Brush and dip it into the Bar Keepers Friend paste.  Take a generous amount and brush it onto your hardware.  Let it sit for approximately 15 to 30 seconds.

Step 3: Take your soft stripping pad or steel wool and dip it into the paste and start scrubbing the hardware that you just brushed the paste onto in Step 2.  You may want to use a toothbrush if you have a piece of hardware that has a lot of small crevices.  This will help you clean out those tiny areas really well.

*Keep in mind, this is just my personal preference, it does not have to be super shinny and perfect (unless that is the look you are going for.  I know you have worked your tail off to make your piece of furniture look updated and beautiful, but it is not a brand new piece of furniture.  So, if you have super shiny and spotless hardware on it, then it may not flow well.  Make sure it all ties together nicely!

Step 4: After you have completed Step 3, take your Distilled White Vinegar and pour it into a disposable cup. I pour enough in the cup to cover the piece of hardware. Drop the hardware into the vinegar and let it sit while you clean the other pieces of hardware. It can sit in the vinegar for a few seconds or a few minutes.  Just do not keep it in the vinegar for over 30 minutes because the vinegar may start stripping the original finish. To make it simple for you, just make sure it gets completely covered in the vinegar and go from there.

*Please note, I want this to be as easy as possible for you, so if you do not have the vinegar on hand, then you can use water to clean it up. I just like to use vinegar because it cleans and sanitizes it all-in-one.

Step 5: Now that the hardware has been covered in the vinegar, you will want to take it out and dry it off. At this point you should be able to see the difference from the before-and-after!  I like to use a shop towel, but you can use an old t-shirt or something that does not shed a lot, if you prefer.

As you can see from the video above, the difference is remarkable and I went through the process rather quickly! So, now what?

After the hardware is nice and dry you can polish it. I like to use a tiny amount of clear wax by Old Barn Milk Paint or Natural Wax by Country Chic Paint (Make sure to use the code MarketHouse10 to receive 10% off of your Country Chic order!) to shine it up and preserve the look. If you want to add a little color back to your hardware without painting it, Rub ‘N Buff is a nice option for this. If you decide you want to paint your hardware, I recommend using Rustoleum Spray Paint.  You may wonder, why can not I just do this in the beginning anyway? Well, the same applies to the hardware as it does your furniture.  You need to have a nice, clean base before you paint anything on it. If not, it may chip or scratch easily. So go ahead and clean it with the Bar Keepers Friend, make sure it is nice and dry and then apply your paint.  

Again, thank you SO much for tuning in this week for my first #TuesdayTipsWithFallon. If you want to save this blog post, make sure you pin it to your Pinterest page and/or feel free to share it elsewhere. I look forward being with you each week and don’t forget to tune in to my Facebook page tomorrow to read about my first #WomenInBusinessWednesday!! Thanks again!

Happy cleaning!!

When the time comes to paint, make sure you check out my favorite brushes!!