Full Tutorial on Water-Damaged Desk Makeover #MondayMakeoversWithFallon

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This beautiful desk came to me with a lot of water damage. I fell in love with the character that the piece had to offer so I was determined to bring it back to life for my client! See the process below.

THE FIXING & PREP PROCESS:

  1. First, I removed the chipping veneer. The veneer was messed up on the right side of the piece because that was where the water leaked on it. The water got underneath the veneer making it hard to repair so I ended up scraping and chipping it all off with a hammer and metal putty knife/scrapper. There were a few stubborn spots, but thankfully most of it came off pretty easily.

  2. I removed the back of the piece because it was falling apart.

  3. I glued and clamped any areas that had cracked due the moisture from the water. I clamped each section together where it had separated. This process took at extra day because there were a lot small cracks all over the piece and I wanted to make sure the glue had ample time to dry.

  4. Once the veneer was completely removed and everything was fixed/glued, I used 60 grit sandpaper on my orbital sander because I needed something really course to get rid of any leftover glue

  5. I then applied Bondo to the areas that I applied glue in the cracks. I wanted to make sure the seams from the cracks were smooth and wouldn’t separate again over time.

  6. I sanded with 120 grit sandpaper to get rid of any rough spots from the Bondo followed by 220 grit on my sander to smooth everything out

  7. I then wiped everything down with Mineral Spirits. Once it was nice and dry I started the painting process

THE PRIMING & PAINTING PROCESS:

  1. I started by priming the whole piece with two coats of BIN Primer

  2. I hand sanded the whole piece to make sure the primer was nice and smooth with 220 grit sandpaper.

  3. Vacuumed the sanding dust

  4. Applied 3 coats of Autentico Vintage Paint in the color Belgian Stone.

  5. I lightly distressed all of the edges to bring the white through. I used 220 grit sandpaper to achieve the look I was going for.

  6. Vacuumed the sanding dust

  7. I painted, sealed and added a new piece of plywood to the back of the piece to replace the old one that was falling apart.

  8. I spray painted the hardware white to match the white that was peeking through the grey where I distressed it.

  9. I white washed the “lattice” so that you could still see through it and made sure it tied in well with the rest of the piece.

  10. I then sealed the whole piece with Autentico Clear Wax, buffed it about 30 minutes after I applied the wax and then applied a second coat. Once the second coat sat on the piece for about 15 minutes, I buffed it one more time to give the piece a little shine.

BEFORE AND AFTERS:

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Complete Tutorial On How To Transform An Antique Vanity To Nightstands!

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Step 1: Separate pieces. Each piece of furniture is different. I wish I could tell you to “do it exactly like this” but sometimes the pieces are connected with screws and other times they are connected with nails. I have even seen both used on the same piece, so just be prepared with a screw driver and hammer in hand. Also, make sure you protect your eyes with safety glasses when you’re removing these pieces!

Step 2: Cut apart. My husband helped me cut the last piece off that connects to the backside of the tables. First he used the reciprocating saw to separate them (you could also use a circular saw) and he then ran the tables through the table saw to get a super clean cut.

Step 3: Add missing piece of molding. Since the piece was separated into two different sections, part of the molding was taken off leaving a gap towards the back of the tables. To fix this, I took a piece off molding from the scraps that I removed in the beginning, cut the molding down with a miter saw, then glued and clamped it to the table. From there, I used Bondo (see step 5) and sanded the area really well so you wouldn’t be able to tell the molding wasn’t original.

Step 4: Clean and sand smooth after cutting. I cleaned the piece inside out with TSP, let it dry really well, then sanded the areas where we cut. I also sanded down the areas where I removed all of the old nails. I wanted to make sure I had a nice clean surface so that when I applied the Bondo to the sides, it would stick well and leave me with a smooth finish.

Step 5: Fill holes. I know, this part looks scary but this is the part that brings everything together! I applied Bondo to each hole and area that had been cut to smooth out the surface. I had to repeat this process a few times to get exact look I wanted. Once the Bondo was dry, I sanded it with 80 grit sandpaper, followed by 220 grit sandpaper on my Random Orbital Sander. Click HERE for a #TuesdayTipsWithFallon tutorial on how I apply Bondo.

Step 6: Clean, Vacuum, Prime, Sand. After I sanded the Bondo to a smooth finish, it was time to clean everything again. I vacuumed off all the sanding dust, scrubbed each piece with TSP and then once everything was completely dry, I applied 2 coats of BIN Shellac Primer. Once the primer was dry, I sanded it to smooth finish with a 220 grit sanding pad. Of course, I vacuumed everything one more time from where I sanded the primer.

Step 7: Apply Paint Color, Distress Edges, Seal with Top Coat. I applied 3 coats of Cathedral Taupe by Fusion Mineral Paint with my 2'“ Palm Pro by Zibra. I lightly hand-distressed the edges with 220 grit sandpaper and sealed each piece with 3 coats of General Finishes High Performance Top Coat in Flat.

Step 8: Sand Legs and Apply Howard’s Restore-A-Finish. Since the original finish was starting to come off, I decided to go ahead remove it to give the legs a fresh look. I hand sanded them with 150 grit sandpaper and then applied Howard’s Restor-A-Finish in Mahogany. After that I applied Howard’s Feed and Wax to preserve and protect the color that I just applied.

Step 9: Wipe down drawers with Howard’s Restore-A-Finish, Line Drawers with Paper, Add New Knobs. First, I wiped the drawers down with Howard’s Restor-A-Finish to bring them back to life. Click HERE for #TuesdayTipsWithFallon tutorial on how I apply Howard’s Restor-A-Finish to drawers. From there, I added vintage hymns as drawer liners and finished each piece off with new knobs!

Before-and-After Pictures:

Guess what!? These are for sale, too!! Click HERE for the listing!!

As always, thank you so much for tuning in this week for #MondayMakeoversWithFallon. If you want to save this blog post so you can refer back to it, make sure you pin it to your Pinterest page and/or feel free to share it elsewhere. I look forward being with you next Monday and don’t forget to tune in tomorrow for my educating video tutorial/tip for #TuesdayTipsWithFallon!!

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Step-by-Step Guide, Spindle Grant Table Makeover #MondayMakeoversWithFallon

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I have been dying to use the color Lichen by Fusion Mineral Paint and it did not disappoint! It's such a soothing green color. Aren’t the spindles amazing on this table? See the makeover below!

The Prep Process:

The Painting Process:

As always, thank you so much for tuning in this week for #MondayMakeoversWithFallon. If you want to save this blog post so you can refer back to it, make sure you pin it to your Pinterest page and/or feel free to share it elsewhere. I look forward being with you next Monday and don’t forget to tune in tomorrow for my educating video tutorial/tip for #TuesdayTipsWithFallon!!

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Industrial Filing Cabinets to Side Tables Makeover #MondayMakeoversWithFallon

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I’ve been on the hunt for a couple of unique filing cabinets so that I could transform them into something cool. These were the perfect fit and you can do so many different things with them. You can make them into side tables/nightstands, set them apart and add a piece of wood to the top to make a desk, or of course, they could be used as filing cabinets! I love when pieces serve so many different purposes. Anyway, when I saw these two I snatched them up and got to work! See the process below.

THE PREP PROCESS:

  • I removed the drawers and laid everything out so I could have easy access to each piece during the cleaning process.

  • I cleaned and scrubbed the cabinets inside-and-out with Krud Kutter and a Scotch Brite pad.

  • I let the cabinets dry really well in the sun, HOWEVER, I did not let the metal get hot because I knew that it would affect the application of the spray paint. I made sure that they dried well (about 30 minutes), but then moved them to the shade.

THE PAINTING PROCESS:

  • The painting process was pretty simple. I found a well ventilated area (not in the direct sunlight) and started spraying! My absolute favorite product to use on metal is Rust-Oleum spray paint. It goes on smooth and holds up really well over time. I probably could have gotten away with (2) cans of spray paint, but being the perfectionist that I am when it comes to painting, I actually used (1.5) cans on each cabinet, so I went through (3) cans total. I wanted to make sure I covered every square inch, inside-and-out.

ADDING WOOD BASE:

  • The base of the filing cabinet measures 12 x 24, so I had a to buy a large board from The Home Depot and cut it down to fit the base.

  • I smoothed out the cut board with a piece of sandpaper then I scuffed up the bottom of the filing cabinet so the glue would adhere well.

  • I just Rapid Bond Super Glue and spread it all over the bottom of the filing cabinet.

  • I quickly placed the cut board on top of the glue. Instead of clamping the board down with clamps, I just added some books and weights to the top to apply pressure.

ADDING HAIRPIN LEGS:

  • I purchased these Hairpin Legs off of Amazon.

  • The instructions recommended screwing the legs in 1.5” from the edge, so that’s what we did!

  • The screws that came with the legs were too long, so I had to purchase new ones (pictured below)

  • I measured and marked each hole then my husband pre-drilled and screwed them in for me.

BEFORE-AND-AFTER PHOTOS: I love the way these turned out! They were just as I envisioned. They can serve many different purposes and are one-of-a-kind!!

Guess what!? These are for sale, too!! Here is the listing: Industrial Filing Cabinets/Side Tables. If you aren’t local and would like a shipping quote, just let me know!

As always, thank you so much for tuning in this week for #MondayMakeoversWithFallon. If you want to save this blog post so you can refer back to it, make sure you pin it to your Pinterest page and/or feel free to share it elsewhere. I look forward being with you next Monday and don’t forget to tune in tomorrow for my educating video tutorial/tip for #TuesdayTipsWithFallon!!

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Humidor to Side Table Makeover #MondayMakeoversWithFallon

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This is one of those pieces that you walk by and you’re like, “Oh my goodness! What a cute little table!” I instantly saw the potential because of it’s petite size! See the process below.

The Prep Process:

  • I removed the hardware and the door. I wasn’t crazy about the door because it drooped a little, so I went ahead and took it off. I also knew I was going to replace the top so I went ahead and unscrewed it and took it off as well.

  • Even though this piece was a humidor, it was pretty clean. I think it was used as a side table, instead of humidor, so it was pretty clean. I went ahead and gave it a good bath though with TSP.

  • Once everything was dry I scuff-sanded the piece with 220 grit sandpaper.

  • After I sanded it, I vacuumed it really well and cleaned it again with Krud-Kutter.

The Staining Process

The Painting Process:

  • For the body of the piece I used Fiddle Leaf by Old Barn Milk Paint.I applied two coats with my Zibra 2” Palm Pro letting each coat dry well in-between.

  • Once both coats were dry, I lightly hand-sanded it with 220 girt sandpaper to give it an aged look. By doing this it added some depth to the piece. The paint also naturally chipped in a few places which was exactly what I wanted!

  • I sealed the entire piece with Clear Wax by Old Barn Milk Paint. After it sat on the piece for about 30 minutes, I buffed it with a shop towel to make it nice and smooth.

  • I added new knobs to match the dark oak top.

As always, thank you so much for tuning in this week for #MondayMakeoversWithFallon. If you want to save this blog post so you can refer back to it, make sure you pin it to your Pinterest page and/or feel free to share it elsewhere. I look forward being with you next Monday and don’t forget to tune in tomorrow for my educating video tutorial/tip for #TuesdayTipsWithFallon!!

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Make sure you check out my other #MondayMakeoversWithFallon blog posts below!

Step-by-Step Guide, A Simple White Table Makeover

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Isn’t this the cutest little table? It was a custom piece I re-did for a client. It definitely needed a refresh and some fixing, but it was a pretty simple process! See below.

THE PREP PROCESS:

  • I cleaned this piece with a 3M sponge and TSP

  • After it was dry, I sanded the top of the piece with 120 grit on my orbital sander and then hand sanded the legs with a 120 grit piece of sandpaper

  • I vacuumed off all of the sanding dust

  • I cleaned the whole piece one more time Krud Kutter and shop towels. I wanted to make sure any lose dirt and dust from where I sanded it was completely gone

THE PRIMING PROCESS:

  • I spray-primed the whole piece with a coat of BIN /Shellac to prevent any potential bleed through

  • Once the Shellac was dry, I lightly hand sanded the piece with 220 grit sandpaper to smooth out the primer

  • I vacuumed the sanding dust so the surface was nice and clean

THE FIXING PROCESS: Just as a side note, I typically fix my pieces before I prime, but I did this piece backwards because it came apart on me during the priming process.

  • I glued the loose areas with Titebond and clamped everything until the glue was nice and dry. I also fixed any screws that had come loose.

  • I filled in the gaps under the table. There wasn’t a lot I could do with this area because the wood had warped. I filled the gaps with caulk to make the piece look nice and complete. Tune in tomorrow for my #TuesdaysTipsWithFallon tutorial so you can see this process.

THE PAINTING PROCESS:

As always, thank you so much for tuning in this week for #MondayMakeoversWithFallon. If you want to save this blog post so you can refer back to it, make sure you pin it to your Pinterest page and/or feel free to share it elsewhere. I look forward being with you next Monday and don’t forget to tune in tomorrow for my educating video tutorial/tip for #TuesdayTipsWithFallon!!

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OH NO!! This Drop Leaf Table Makeover Didn’t Go As Planned!!

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As promised, I wrote a blog post on the restoration process of the tricky maple table and chairs. This is the part you don’t typically see, but I wanted to share because it was a learning experience for me which will hopefully turn into a learning experience for you!

The Stripping Process: I went through my normal process of how I strip stain/paint. I brushed on a coat of CitriStip with a chip brush and covered it up with Saran Wrap. I let it sit for about 6 hours before I checked it. Sometimes I let the CitriStrip sit for up to 24 hours, checking it about every 6 to 12 hours to make sure everything working as it’s supposed to. This time when I pulled back the Saran Wrap I noticed it looked different than it normally does. So, I kept pulling it off and that’s about the time I kind of freaked out.

UMMM, what in the world happened!?

It looks like the stain “pooled” in areas, doesn’t it? Well, the super odd part is that after I cleaned all of the stripper off, leaving no CitriStrip on it (according to touch) all of that mess was still there. I could take a nail and scratch it across the top and nothing would come off on it. I was stumped. It was super weird. The only thing I could think to do was let it dry because maybe it was just damp deep down in the wood, but it wasn’t, so unfortunately that didn’t work. In the segment of pictures below, the 5th and 6th pictures are almost a week after this occurred.

I contacted a few of my professional painter friends and sent them this video! Bare with me, I originally had no intention of doing a blog post on this, so the video isn’t the best. I just want you to have a view of the table “live” if that makes sense?!

I tried everything I could think of to get the mess off of the top. I cleaned it. I sanded the heck out of it. I tried to strip small areas again. I tested other stripping products…nothing worked. Maybe it was sap or tannins, but, I honestly think the wood reacted in an odd way causing the CitriStrip to burn it.

For some odd reason this particular piece did not want to be stripped down, so the only thing I thought I could do was just sand it really hard. HA! Maple is a hard wood and this stuff wasn’t budging, so after I made it about three inches across the table and I went through at least 5 sanding discs I knew I was going to burn out my sander and I needed to call in the big guns.

I had to take the pieces to a professional sawmill and get an 1/8 of an inch planned off the top. In the pictures below you can see how much better it looked, but even after getting an 1/8” taken off, there were still some spots coming through so I had to spend a few more hours and sand those off with my orbital sander.

You may be wondering, did she try all 3 pieces? Yes, because curiosity had the best of me. I wanted to know if all three pieces would react the same way and they did. However, I didn’t use Saran Wrap on the other two pieces. Instead, I just brushed the CitriStrip on and let it sit for about 30 minutes. It was okay though because at that point I knew I was going to get them planned down and in all honesty, I wanted to have all 3 pieces planned at the same time because I wanted everything to match well.

WOW! So the stripping process took a lot longer than I anticipated! Now, I can finally paint and stain everything!

THE STAINING PROCESS:

THE PAINTING PROCESS:

Okay, so what did we learn from this!? Tables are finicky! While this case was extreme, I don’t think I have ever worked on a table that didn’t have some type of issue. They have been cleaned so many times compared to regular pieces of furniture because people eat off of them and I think over time all of the chemicals take a toll on the wood and cause it to react in different ways.

Again, out of all the tables and pieces of furniture I have ever stripped, this is the first time something this extreme has happened. That’s good news, right? If you’re hesitant to strip a piece or afraid something like this could potential occur, test a small area on the top or the underside of the piece first.

In the end, my client was extremely happy with the results. I had to tell her what happened, otherwise she would have never known. Thankfully, it turned out great and it was exactly what she wanted!

As always, thank you so much for tuning in this week for #MondayMakeoversWithFallon. If you want to save this blog post so you can refer back to it, make sure you pin it to your Pinterest page and/or feel free to share it elsewhere. I look forward being with you next Monday and don’t forget to tune in tomorrow for my educating video tutorial/tip for #TuesdayTipsWithFallon!!

*Please note, this post does contain affiliate links.


Make sure you check out my other #MondayMakeoversWithFallon blog posts below!

Step-by-Step Guide, Grey Chest-of-Drawers with Glass Knobs

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When I saw this chest-of-drawers I immediately knew I wanted to soften it up with a light color and big glass knobs. I envisioned it going in a girl's bedroom and that's exactly where it ended up going. Yay! See the process below.

THE PREP PROCESS:

  • I removed the drawers, took off the knobs (placed them in a Ziplock bag)

  • I cleaned this piece with a 3M sponge and TSP

  • After it was dry, I sanded the piece really well. It had a lot of scratches on it, so I used 150 grit sandpaper on my orbital sander and then I followed up with 220 grit to smooth it out a little bit.

  • I then vacuumed off all of the sanding dust, inside and out.

  • I cleaned the whole piece one more time Krud Kutter and shop towels. I wanted to make sure any lose dirt and dust from where I sanded it was completely gone.

  • I taped off all of the edges with painter’s tape

  • Once the prep process was complete, I waited 24 hours to make sure the chemical products I used had ample time to dry.

THE PAINTING PROCESS:

  • I primed the whole piece with 2 coats of BIN /Shellac to prevent any potential bleed through.

  • Once the Shellac was dry, I lightly hand sanded the piece with 220 grit sandpaper to smooth out the primer, dusted the piece off and a ran a tack cloth across it to make sure the piece was nice and smooth.

  • I applied 3 coats General Finishes Seagull Grey using my Zibra Fan brush and 2” Palm Pro.

  • I vacuumed the sanding dust.

  • I applied 3 coats of General Finishes High Performance Top Coat in Flat with my Zibra Chisled Wedge

  • At the end of the process I purchased a new back for the piece because the original one was gone. I went ahead and painted it to match the dresser to give a nice complete look. I purchased the wood from The Home Depot.

The gorgeous knobs on this chest-of-drawers are my favorite and the best price on the market! I got them from D.Lawless Hardware and they were the perfect touch to complete the look of this piece!

As always, thank you so much for tuning in this week for #MondayMakeoversWithFallon. If you want to save this blog post so you can refer back to it, make sure you pin it to your Pinterest page and/or feel free to share it elsewhere. I look forward being with you next Monday and don’t forget to tune in tomorrow for my educating video tutorial/tip for #TuesdayTipsWithFallon!!

*Please note, this post does contain affiliate links.


Make sure you check out my other #MondayMakeoversWithFallon blog posts below!